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« Government surveillance of windfarm protestor | Main | Mann, straw man and SciAm »
Tuesday
Jan102012

Big science - Josh 138

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Reader Comments (6)

Well, you just have to make up your own facts. To take a couple of examples in the UK news today, HighSpeed trains and Scottish Independence. Two or more sides to each issue, and the sides put out claims which just cannot be reconciled. HS2 will repay its investment in intangibles, or it can't. Scots are heavily subsidised, or are they in fact supporting England. Every claim rapidly rebutted. Every paper 'debunked' (I'm beginning to see that word as a BS flag in itself). You will find the same thing going on in energy planning, or climate of course. Liars lying, knowing they are lying, to fool the public and work their way to the pile of cash. Trust no-one.

Jan 10, 2012 at 5:33 PM | Unregistered CommenterRhoda

It is a very old saying: "Believe nothing of what you are told and half of what you see and you will be well informed."

Nothing new here. Good cartoon, Josh.

Jan 10, 2012 at 5:39 PM | Unregistered CommenterDon Pablo de la Sierra

HighSpeed trains could be covered by Air Travel for a lot less money but you would have to drop the flight taxes and admit CO2 is a gas and not a pollutant.

And the Scottish Independence is not on offer, the choice is rule With Westminster or ruled By Brussels.

Jan 10, 2012 at 5:40 PM | Unregistered CommenterBreath of Fresh Air

Well, Shakespeare had it down pretty well. Malvolio is humourless, serious, and detests human sin, but is fatally gullible. Sir Toby Belch is the precise opposite. We vote for, are governed by, preached at and tormented by one or the other, guess which.

Jan 10, 2012 at 8:12 PM | Unregistered CommenterPharos

quote from the book description "...and the government are learning to use networked knowledge to understand more than ever and to make smarter decisions... "

It sounds plausible, but I'm betting the English and Australians would disagree at this point. The rest of Europe seem to be lost and bewildered too. The Canadians seem to be getting it. (I'm refering to the governments only).

Jan 10, 2012 at 9:45 PM | Unregistered CommenterGreg Cavanagh

Don,

Those are words I take to heart.

One thing I've noticed in reading climate sites is the amount of debate by people I believe to be very highly educated (i.e. PhD's) on not only complex subject matter, but that which one might think is basic. One that comes immediately to mind occured over on WUWT on the topic of "ocean acidification" (not my term). There ended up with a very interested discussion and disagreement on the behavior of Calcium Carbonate in a solution. It is facinating to watch.

Jan 10, 2012 at 11:37 PM | Unregistered Commentertimg56

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