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Okay - that link does not last forever. Instead, simply search for this in Google:

"the number of households in fuel poverty would fall almost a third"

and you should generate a new link. Chris Huhne does not lack ingenuity when it comes to conjuring up new figures to support green investment.

Oct 21, 2011 at 7:28 AM | Unregistered Commentermatthu

Here is an FT link to the story on redefinition of fuel poverty that works:

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/809d6ffa-fa63-11e0-be7b-00144feab49a.html#axzz1bOWpjJBa

Oct 21, 2011 at 7:23 AM | Unregistered Commentermatthu

Did we miss this? Roger Pielke Jr draws attention to the fact that

"The UK coalition government and their creative policy analysts have come up with a solution for [ the political consequences of the projected increases in fuel poverty ] -- they are proposing to redefine "fuel poverty" in a manner that shows it to be decreasing, not increasing."

http://rogerpielkejr.blogspot.com/2011/10/uk-fuel-poverty-solved.html

Oct 21, 2011 at 7:19 AM | Unregistered Commentermatthu

Andrew,

Don't know if you spotted this over at Climate Etc ... but amidst the Gleickenslaught on her The Delinquent Teenager ... thread, THSI came in for some very high praise:

curryja | October 20, 2011 at 7:45 am

I haven’t seen any other books on the subject of the IPCC. I give Montford’s book The Hockey Stick Illusion a full 5 stars. Montford’s book will stand the test of time in terms of a history of science book about this episode, and it is being cited in scholarly papers (check google scholar). It remains to be seen whether Laframboise’s book will achieve the same stature. That said, Laframboise’s book may be more influential politically in the short term. [emphasis added -hro]

[BH adds - thanks, I hadn't seen that]

Oct 21, 2011 at 5:28 AM | Unregistered Commenterhro001

Mighty ice grip shoes from the Guardian shop:

http://www.guardianoffers.co.uk/mall/productpage.cfm/GuardianOffers/_E923/%2D/Mighty-Ice-Grips-%28for-flat-shoes%29

But hasn't climate change put an end to ice?

Oct 20, 2011 at 9:56 PM | Unregistered CommenterGeary

from Climate Depot...!

PARIS—Former French Science Minister Claude Allègre is at the center of a new controversy stemming from his role as a prominent climate change skeptic.

Sixty members of the French Academy of Sciences have written to the chancellor of the Institute of France, historian Gabriel de Broglie, objecting to Allègre's position at the new Fondation Ecologie d'Avenir, one of some 100 active foundations sheltered by the institute. The institute is also the umbrella organization for France's five academies, including that for sciences.

The 11 October letter, signed by such luminaries as 1997 physics Nobelist Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and former Academy president and physicist É douard Brézin, complains that several academy members discovered the existence of the foundation from press reports last week. The signatories note that an academy report last year disavowed Allègre's view that industry isn't a significant driver of climate change. In particular, the report stated that the increase in CO2 emissions and, to a lesser degree, other greenhouse gases were "unquestionably due to human activity." That increase, it adds, "constitutes a threat to the climate" and contributes to ocean acidification.

The report reflected the outcome of a debate held by the academy at the request of then science minister Valérie Pécresse in response to the outcry over Allègre's book, The Climate Fraud. More than 400 French climatologists had asked Pécresse to disavow Allègre's book, which they said was riddled with errors, and to express confidence in the climate research community.

Allègre, who was minister from 1997 to 2000, created the foundation, which takes a multidisciplinary approach to addressing major ecological challenges facing the planet. The foundation's home page features an editorial by Allègre and a video by new medicine Nobelist Jules Hoffman, who praises the foundation for bringing together scientists, economists, philosophers, and sociologists to find "a new way for satisfying those who love nature and depend on agricultural output." The foundation held its first conference last week, on bio-inspired technologies, and plans others on new technologies in agriculture.

The French daily Libération reported in an online blog that Catherine Bréchignac, perpetual secretary of the Academy of Sciences, former president of the basic research agency CNRS, and chair of the foundation's executive committee, said in a radio interview last week that the row was a "personal squabble" and that Allègre "would play no role in the foundation." ScienceInsider was unable to reach Bréchignac for further comment. The Institute of France did not respond to a request for comment on the academicians' letter, nor did five other members of the foundation's orientation committee. Hoffman said he was not available for comment today.
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Oct 20, 2011 at 9:22 PM | Unregistered CommenterPeter Walsh

After the Fox/Werrity scandal another bogus "ministerial adviser" - this time in DECC:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/oct/19/second-conservative-minister-accused-adviser?newsfeed=true

Amazingly, from the grauniad!

Oct 20, 2011 at 4:16 PM | Unregistered CommenterRoger Longstaff
Oct 20, 2011 at 3:13 PM | Unregistered CommenterElsabio
Oct 20, 2011 at 9:31 AM | Unregistered CommenterJiminy Cricket

I had to read this article a couple of times because of the sheer weight of the implications that it is proposing and my disbelief in what the authors are requesting.

http://www.theatlantic.com/life/archive/2011/10/whats-the-greenest-building-the-problem-with-ranking-systems/246965/

'The huge role of policy in solving the world's environmental problems suggests that corporate activism should be considered in all best-of lists

Including advocacy in their criteria will not only make rankings more accurate, but will also be good for the planet by steering consumers and investors in a positive direction -- along with rated companies themselves. Businesses respond to negative ratings.'

The basics of this article, correct me if my interpretation is wrong, is that it is no longer enough to practice what they preach, it is now necessary for business to preach what they preach!

This is not religious conviction?

Oct 20, 2011 at 8:26 AM | Unregistered CommenterLord Beaverbrook

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