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Discussion > NGOs, Corruption, entryism etc.

With all the allegations and denials, will Aid Agencies/Charities/NGOs admit prostituting themselves for cash, to the selfish needs of Climate Scientists?

Feb 16, 2018 at 5:21 PM | Unregistered Commentergolf charlie

Friday
Yorkshire Post :says 137 historic offences of sex abuse within shops

Times : says that despite Roland new denials that he never used prostitutes, they have seen Oxfam documents which say he did admit that.

- A Times commentator said we should simply cut out the middleman and give aid CASH direct to individuals
... Nutter the village mafia would just take the money etc.

Feb 17, 2018 at 11:57 AM | Registered Commenterstewgreen

gc

HRC has the hots for David Miliband - that's quite (farcically) obvious imho

Feb 17, 2018 at 1:04 PM | Registered Commentertomo

“Aid” does anything but aid – it keeps the poor poor. What chance does the local farmer have of selling his produce, when the market is flooded with cheap – or even free – produce? Where is the incentive to do something, when if you just kick back and do nothing, “aid” agencies will flood in, and do it all for you…. for a while, then they just pack up and leave; until the cameras come back… “Aid” is just to assuage western guilt – of what, no-one is sure, but, whatever it was, it was all the fault of the west, that’s for sure.

Feb 17, 2018 at 1:13 PM | Registered CommenterRadical Rodent

May 2017 Church investment fund declared 17% gain
This yea they're already putting out stories they didn't do so well

PA \\The head of the Church of England's investment arm has flagged that its £7.9 billion fund will fail to match the stellar returns logged in 2016, but said ethical policies were not to blame.

While the fund managed to rake in a bumper 17.1% return on the back of a strong performance in equities in 2016, it sold down its stock holdings by around 17 per cent or £500 million to help re-balance the portfolio during the same year, meaning a smaller boost from a further rise in stock prices is expected from 2017.

Andrew Brown, secretary and chief executive of the Church Commissioners, said: "Like all investors we were faced in 2017 with a number of headwinds and we've seen it with sterling, we've seen it with inflation and global markets have slowed.

"Equities had the strongest year in 2017, but equities make up about 40% of our fund, so we're heavily diversified," he said, adding that the fund invests in a raft of real estate, absolute return funds, hedge funds, private equity and venture capital.

"So 2017 is not going to be such a strong year as 2016, I'm sorry to say."

It means expectations for income growth will have to be managed, as the fund helps provide about 15% of the Church of England's annual operating costs.

However, Mr Brown said the weaker performance was not due to the Church Commissioners' responsible investment policy, which excludes stake in companies that do business in areas involving pornography, tobacco, gambling, high interest rate lending, human embryonic cloning and oil sands extraction.

Its is also committed to engaging with firms on environmental, social and governance issues, in the hopes of either changing corporate behaviour, with divestment a last resort.

"Any decision to reduce a benchmark of an investability will in some years have a negative effect... (but) there have been other years where actually rather than a headwind, an ethical slant to our fund has meant that we've benefited.

"So we're a long-term investor, we're a perpetual endowment and it's undoubtedly the right thing for us to do to invest in that way which means excluding those companies which, some years, have very good years."

Late last year, the Church threatened to pull investment from mining companies that fail to "uphold high standards", saying the industry is "particularly vulnerable" to poor governance, having already sold off stakes in Vedanta in 2010 and Soco International in 2015. //

Feb 26, 2018 at 3:37 PM | Registered Commenterstewgreen

Feb 26, 2018 at 3:37 PM | stewgreen

Which proves that the Church Commissioners DID learn some lessons from 25 years ago. They had a lot to learn, and there is still room for improvement.

Feb 26, 2018 at 5:31 PM | Unregistered Commentergolf charlie

Have The Guardian been censoring the news they will investigate?

https://order-order.com/2018/02/26/guardian-sat-on-charity-sex-abuse-scandal-stories/

Feb 27, 2018 at 12:47 AM | Unregistered Commentergolf charlie

However, Mr Brown said the weaker performance was not due to the Church Commissioners' responsible investment policy, which excludes stake in companies that do business in areas involving pornography, tobacco, gambling, high interest rate lending, human embryonic cloning and oil sands extraction.

I guess I'm no longer surprised by such stuff, but what is their ostensible reason for excluding oil sands extraction?

Many traditional petroleum sources, which they presumably seem OK with, come from sandstone buried beneath the surface. But in Alberta, nature has long ago created the mother of all oil spills. An industry that extracts the petroleum resources from this surface phenomenum could legitimately claim to be actually improving the environment if it returns the surface layer/soil in a better state than it started. Obviously this could be done well, done badly, or not done at all.

But that is hardly a reason to exclude the industry entirely. Do the Church's investment managers know something that is not available to the rest of the world, or is it the same old green twaddle being swallowed wholesale by people who can't be bothered to do their job properly, again?

Mar 1, 2018 at 1:43 AM | Unregistered Commentermichael hart