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Discussion > COP 23

Asociación Regional de Pueblos Indígenas de la Selva Central sent 2 delegates to COP23. Their website can be found here:

https://arpisc.wordpress.com/

"The Regional Association of Indigenous Peoples of the Central Selva, ARPISC , is one of the six regional organizations of the Interethnic Association of Development of the Peruvian Jungle AIDESEP , an indigenous organization of national character that is affiliated to the Coordinator of the Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon Basin , COICA .

In addition, ARPI SC is a promoter and member of the Permanent Conference of the Indigenous Peoples of Peru, COPPIP.

ARPI SC, legitimizes it on May 24, 2004, from there it begins to work as an interlocutor organization of the indigenous peoples of the Central Selva.

Its purpose is the defense of the territories of the indigenous peoples of the central jungle, in the use and sustained management of natural resources, cultural practice, language and the defense of human and political rights of the indigenous peoples of the region. .

Currently ARPISC represents 356 native communities and 10 federations, which comprise 5 indigenous peoples: Ashaninka, Yanesha, Nomachigüenga, Yine, Machigüenga, Kakinte."

And:

"The lines of action of ARPI SC are oriented in the thematic axes of work with their specific tasks:


Governance: Organizational Strengthening, Intercultural Movement of the Peruvian Amazon (MIAP) Arawak, Leadership Training, Administration of Justice, Legal Initiatives, Relations with the State.

Territoriality: Sanitation, physical, territorial, registration cleansing of Native Communities, Protected Natural Areas (ANP), Reconstruction of NPP . displaced by violence, Defense of Natural Resources and biodiversity, ARAWAK Territory.


Culture: Creation of the Arawak Ecological University Central Forest, Training, Training, Updating, Specialization and Professionalization of Bilingual Intercultural Teachers Arawak, Baccalaureate, Bachelor and Doctorate of Bilingual Intercultural Teachers, Thesis Elaboration Workshops, Scholarships and Universities, Communication and Dissemination , Undocumented, Natural medicine, Research, Life plans.

Economy: Integral Development of Indigenous Communities in the Amazon Tropical Forest (DICIBTA), Tourism, Food Security, Crafts."

Personally I don't see anything in that which justifies sending 2 people to Bonn last November. The delegates were:

Mr. Lizardo Cauper, Indigenous Leader.

Unfortunately he is quoted by WWF, referring in turn to COP23,here:

http://www.wwf.org.pe/informate/noticias_new/noticias/?uNewsID=315791

They manage to tie it into climate change, inevitably, I suppose:

"Territorial security in the Amazon is a key step to mitigate climate change".

Mr. Alonso Cordova, Advisor:

"I am the head of the WWF office in Madre de Dios and part of the Forest and Climate team, looking at issues that concern governance and indigenous peoples."

'Nuff said...

Feb 13, 2018 at 7:06 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association Actions Vitales Pour Le Développement Durable sent a staggering 17 people to COP23. This is their website:

http://avd.organisation.over-blog.com/

"AVD is a youth association whose goal is to contribute to the ecological citizenship education of Cameroonian youth and adults by integrating the principles of sustainable development into their habits and daily attitudes for their full participation in management. and safeguarding a sustainable environment for all. The Association is composed of a Coordinating Committee, Assistants and Volunteers."

And there's this:

"The Coordinator of Vital Actions for Sustainable Development , Jean Paul Brice Affana, has joined the delegation of the Commonwealth Youth Climate Newtork (CYCN) at the '' London + 20 '' youth-led event on the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio + 20), London, UK, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil The CYCN was funded by the Youth Affairs Division of the Commonwealth Secretariat , which is based in London, UK."

In other words, we, the UK taxpayer, probably paid for it.

Delegates:

Ms. Johanna-Maria Schäfer, Chief Executive Officer, BonnLAB:

"Johanna Schäfer has launched the Bonn City Laboratory. As part of her bachelor thesis, the 24-year-old aspiring architect had dealt with urban development in general and Bonn in particular. She developed a concept that divided modern urban development issues into a total of six areas to analyze the status quo, develop a strategy for improvement, and address its implementation. With reference to Beethoven's year 2020, she had named the individual sections in the style of Bonn's favorite son: for example, "LudwigFun" for the cultural section, "BeetHöfe" for the architectural section.

After successfully completing her bachelor thesis, the Beueler went on two career paths last November: "I had the choice between the uncertain path to self-employment and a secure full-time job. I'm still young, you can risk something. That's why I decided to try my own thing. "

So she put her bachelor thesis into practice. Schäfer had moved into an office for free temporary use at Berliner Freiheit 36 ​​for the creation of the work. Here she had quickly come in contact with interested residents, had exchanged with them and their thoughts involved in the work. Johanna Schäfer: »I did not want to lose the synergetic quality of such a place.

The house at the Berliner Freiheit was no longer available due to planned demolition. That's why I was looking for something new. "In Beuels Zingsheimstrasse 2, on the corner of Limpericher Strasse, she found what she was looking for in a vacant shop. With the signature under the lease BonnLAB was born."

All very interesting, but how was a German architect attending COP23 as a delegate of "a youth association whose goal is to contribute to the ecological citizenship education of Cameroonian youth and adults"?

Ms. Yiping Chen. This is a common name on the internet, but I assume this is her (from LinkedIn):

"Deputy Head of Climate Change and Energy at British Consulate-General Shanghai

Current Deputy Head of Climate Change and Energy (East China)- British Consulate-General Shanghai at Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Past COP 23 Observer at UNFCCC, Climate Change and Energy Project Manager at Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Immigration Liaison Assistant-...
Education University of Bristol
Summary • 3+ years of project management experiences in low carbon and energy across government and industry in China and the UK".

It looks as though the British taxpayer may have been paying here too. And a similar question falls to be asked:

How was the Deputy Head of Climate Change and Energy (East China)- British Consulate-General Shanghai at Foreign and Commonwealth Office attending COP23 as a delegate of "a youth association whose goal is to contribute to the ecological citizenship education of Cameroonian youth and adults"? I can see why she might want to be there, but how did she attend as part of this delegation?

Ms. Wing Ching Ho. Another common internet name, so I won't post anything regarding her, for fear of identifying the wrong person. Again, though, why is someone with a Chinese name attending as a delegate of an organisation based in, or at least concerned, with, Cameroon? Who paid for her attendance?

Ms. Yin Ting Leung. This might be her:

"Youth4SDG
Chinese youth advocate
Starting September 2016"

If so, the same questions again fall to be asked - what was she doing at Bonn as part of this delegation, and who was paying?

Mr. Ruixin Li:

It's possible (though I may be wrong) he's Mr Ruixin Li who attended COP20 as a delegate for the China Association for NGO Cooperation. If so, what was he doing attending again as a delegate of Association Actions Vitales Pour Le Développement Durable, and who paid for him to go? This delegation looks as though it was taken over by the Chinese!

Ms. Jing Liu. It is possible this is her:

"I am interested in the impact of global change on harmful cyanobacteria, specifically on the toxins they produce. Various cyanobacteria have the ability to produce toxins. Among the globally most distributed toxins are microcystins, a family of oligopeptides that can cause serious damage to the liver. Microcystin exists many variants that differ in two variable amino acid positions. As a consequence, they have distinct C:N ratios. Moreover, they also differ in their toxicity, and it seems that the more toxic variants have higher C:N ratios as compared to the less toxic variants. My research is focused on one of the main climate-driven factors, i.e. elevated pCO2 in the atmosphere. An important question is how different CO2 concentrations may change the cellular stoichiometry of cyanobacteria (C:N:P), and subsequently the functional compounds such as amino acids and different microcystin variants. Ultimately we want to understand how this may affect the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. In addition, we try to understand the mechanisms underlying different cellular pathways and potential trade-offs between growth and nutrient use efficiencies in response to environmental changes."

The above is posted on the website of Netherlands Institute of Ecology. If it is her, then the same questions again fall to be asked.

Ms. Denise Loga:

"Guide to COP23 Food & Agriculture Events:

Afternoon brief: The way forward with Ms. Denise Loga, Sustainable Food Academy
Moderator: Dan Saladino, BBC Food Programme"

Good to see the BBC in on the act. Why was someone from the Sustainable Food Academy at COP23 as a delegate of "a youth association whose goal is to contribute to the ecological citizenship education of Cameroonian youth and adults" and who was paying?

Mme Sabrina Marquant. I assume this is her:

"Climate Chance
Researcher - Climate and energy public policies in Europe. Crisis and environmental conflicts".

Same questions!

Mr. Michael Fred Alexander, Neitzel, Germanwatch.

We've encountered Germanwatch before. This how they describe themselves:

"“Observing, Analysing, Acting” under this motto Germanwatch has been engaged since 1991 for global equity and the preservation of livelihoods. The politics and economics of the North, with their global consequences, stand at the centre of our work.

The situation of marginalised people in the South form the starting point for our engagement for sustainable development. The political and globalised market structures of the North, as well as their resource-intensive mode of production, which is now being increasingly imitated, are influencing human lives worldwide.

We advocate for a political, economic and social framework which can ensure a future for the people of the South, who are being pushed to the margins of society through unbridled globalisation and whose very existence is threatened by the loss of their ecological and economic foundations of their livelihoods."

A huge section of their website is given over to climate change. So I understand why Mr Alexander wanted to attend COP23, but the same questions arise as to how he attended as part of this particular delegation.

Mr. Ruiming Song:

He looks like a serial attender:

"Youth Delegate, COP 21 (in Paris) & 22 (in Marrakech); Member, China Youth Climate Action Network (CYCAN)".

Same questions...

Mr. Zekai Wang, Youthink Center:

E.g. "PEOPLES’ VOICES CELEBRATED DURING ECO FORUM GLOBAL IN CHINA:

The Secretary General Wang Zekai of the Youthink Center and other guests of honor also delivered keynote speeches."

Same questions...

Ms. Xiaochen Wang:

A very common name, so could be any one of a number of people. But the same questions crop up...

Ms. Siyu Wang:

She appears to be another member of China Youth Climate Action Network (CYCAN). Same questions.

Ms. Koby Lok Yin Wong. I can't identify her with confidence, but the same questions arise.

Mr. Ziqi Yin. This might be him:

"Ziqi Yin currently works at the College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University. Ziqi does research in Hydrology, Climatology and Geography. Their current project is 'Simulating the evaporation of Qinghai Lake in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.'"

In which case, the same questions arise.

Ms. Jiayue Zeng. I can't identify her with any certainty, but the same questions arise.

Mr. Chenyu Zhao - ditto.

We've seen this before - an organisation apparently taken over by people with nothing to do with it, who attend a COP ostensibly as their delegates. Obviously there's nothing criminal going on here, but it does seem very strange. What is going on? How does it happen? How/why is it allowed? And in this case, how did a lot of Chinese people (and a few others) shoehorn themselves into COP23 ostensibly as delegates of "a youth association whose goal is to contribute to the ecological citizenship education of Cameroonian youth and adults"?

Feb 15, 2018 at 7:34 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association Actions Vitales Pour Le Développement Durable sent a staggering 17 people to COP23, as mentioned above, even if none of the delegates seem to have much if anything to do with them. So Association Climate-KIC's mere 4-person delegation seems a bit lightweight by comparison. Their website can be found here:

http://www.climate-kic.org/

"EIT Climate-KIC is a European knowledge and innovation community, working to accelerate the transition to a zero-carbon economy.

Supported by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology, we identify and support innovation that helps society mitigate and adapt to climate change. We believe that a decarbonised, sustainable economy is not only necessary to prevent catastrophic climate change, but presents a wealth of opportunities for business and society.

Convening networks of expertise
We bring together partners in the worlds of business, academia, and the public and non-profit sectors to create networks of expertise, through which innovative products, services and systems can be developed, brought to market and scaled-up for impact.

Through our convening power, EIT Climate-KIC brings together the most effective groups to create the innovation that can lead to systemic change."

The website of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology interestingly has a section entitled "WHAT'S IN IT FOR YOU". I would suggest that could stand as the mantra for many of the parties and the delegates attending COP23. Their website also explains who they are:

"The European Institute of Innovation & Technology (EIT) is an independent body of the European Union set up in 2008 to spur innovation and entrepreneurship across Europe. The EIT brings together leading higher education institutions, research labs and companies to form dynamic cross-border partnerships – Knowledge and Innovation Communities - that develop innovative products and services, start new companies, and train a new generation of entrepreneurs. The innovation communities are also tasked with overcoming some of the greatest challenges our society faces, including climate change, the use of raw materials, energy and active ageing. How do the innovation communities do this? See their own pages at the 'EIT Community' link above to find out more."

So, via a convoluted route, it's fair to say that this lot are being paid for by the EU taxpayer, and therefore in large part by the UK taxpayer.

Delegates:

Mr. Marc Weissgerber, CFO, Association Climate-KIC:

"Marc was previously CFO and Managing Director of Veolia, Deutschland. He has great experience working in complex finance organisations and brings in-depth knowledge of working in both public and private organizations. Marc has strong political interests and is a Founding Member of the Advisory Group on Energy and Climate (Wirtshaftsforum der SPD). He acts as an advisor and coach to social business start-ups and holds an MBA (finance) from the University of Cambridge."

Ms. Andrea Karpati, Head of Policy, Association Climate-KIC:

"Andrea is a senior policy analyst for the Daily Planet. She is head of policy at the EU's main climate innovation initiative, Climate-KIC." The Daily Planet's output includes such brilliant insights as "Net impact on Europe’s energy demand depends on population growth". That piece was offered by the next delegate:

Ms. Christine Danielle Lariviere, Communication, Association Climate-KIC.

Finally, Ms. Regina Lovett, Association Climate-KIC:

"Gina Lovett is a climate change communications specialist, whose experience spans content and outreach, journalism, campaigning and education. Prior to EIT Climate-KIC, she worked for the Royal College of Art in London, integrating sustainability into design education. She holds a MSc Environmental Geography (cum laude) from the University of Amsterdam. Her published work includes the Handbook of Climate Change Communication Vol.2 (Springer)." 'Nuff said.

What do these people get paid, I wonder, and who pays their wages?

Feb 16, 2018 at 7:51 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association Democratique des Femmes du Maroc sent 3 delegates to COP23 (at least they were all female). Their website is here:

http://www.annalindhfoundation.org/members/association-democratique-des-femmes-du-maroc-adfm

Well, sort of - it seems to be a page on the website of the Anna Lindh Foundation, whose website says this:

"The purpose of the Anna Lindh Foundation is to bring people together from across the Mediterranean to improve mutual respect between cultures and to support civil society."

"Co-financed by the 42 countries of the Union for the Mediterranean and the European Commission, the ALF is governed by a Board of Governors composed by representatives of those countries."

So that's another one ultimately funded, at least in part, by the UK taxpayer (so long as we remain in the EU). Here's a recent tweet from Anna Lindh Foundation:

"Head of the European Union Delegation to Egypt visits the Foundation HQ in Alexandria to discuss strengthening @AnnaLindh on the regional stage, visibility and the roll-out in 2018 of #YoungMedVoices (YMV). "

Anyway, delegates:

Ms. Dalila Loudyi, Membre, Coalition Marocaine pour la Justice Climatique, Forum des Alternatives Maroc:

"Dalila Loudyi currently works at the Water and Environmental Engineering, Université Hassan II de Casablanca. Dalila does research in Environmental Engineering, Computational Physics and Mathematical Physics. Their most recent publication is 'Méthode des volumes finis et précision des modèles numériques des écoulements souterrains.'"

"Flood Protection Strategy in the River Basin of Bouregreg and Chaouia: Example of Adaptation Measures to Climate Change in Morocco. Author : Dalila Loudyi, Abdellah Ezzaouini and Amal Fahd."

Mme Nadia Hmaity, Bureau Membre, Environment, Association Democratique des Femmes du Maroc:

"At a reception in the pavilion with free espresso and pastries — a rarity at these talks — Moroccan activist Nadia Hmaity seemed a bit overwhelmed.

“It’s huge,” Hmaity said. “Even the pieces of cakes are big.”

In fact, everything at the unofficial US headquarters is so big and flashy that Hmaity at first thought it was sponsored by Trump. But when she learned it was paid for by an American businessman, she said it was “worth every penny. ... Your government said 'no,' and somebody else said 'I’ll be in.' So if you do it, do it in the biggest way, and let everybody talk about it.”"

Ms. Manar Talhi, President, Women Economic Empowerment, WE act for Africa:

"WE Act for Africa, with a new dimension of women's leadership, aims to become the privileged interlocutor of decision-makers for the promotion of women's entrepreneurship in Africa. The network works for the Economic Empowerment of Women Faced with Climate Change. Building on this commitment, WEAct for Africa is mobilizing competent African women leaders and organizations to take ownership of new environmental practices in society. An action plan is launched in Marrakech in the context of COP 22, for field support in Africa to ensure the positioning of women in decision-making positions in their community, particularly in the fight against poverty. against climate change. Manar Talhi, President of the association"

Feb 19, 2018 at 7:31 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association des communautés urbaines de France (ACUF) sent 2 delegates to COP23. Their website tells us that "Since 1 January 2016, ACUF and AMGVF merged to create a new association "France urbaine"." Yet they seem to retain independent identities for the purposes of COP23. The merged organisation's website can be found here:

http://franceurbaine.org/

Google translate's translation leaves something to be desired:

"It participates in the structuring of the urban world and the attractiveness of its entire territory. Its legitimacy predisposes it to maintain numerous contacts with the executive and the Parliament, with which it collaborates daily in order to defend the interests of the territories and the citizens.

By developing services to its members in order to better respond to the challenges they face, it brings new thinking to local, national, European and international debates.

To meet the challenges of our society, urban territories have a responsibility that goes beyond their administrative boundaries. In this sense, urban France defends an "alliance of territories" able to facilitate territorial cooperation and ensure full effectiveness of public policies.

To work on the files and prepare the positions, France Urban has thematic commissions chaired by elected officials and working groups or projects set up at the whim of the news to be force of proposal on issues with technical content.

It also has powerful information resources: a website showcasing the action of the association coupled with a Corporate Social Network to exchange between members, a weekly newsletter "Urban Territories", a twitter @France_urban thread for continuously follow the action of the association, studies, flash surveys to collect quantitative and qualitative information on current topics and key events such as the Conference of Cities, the National Days of Urban France or the Finance Day elected officials."

Delegates:

Mr. Jean-patrick Masson, Vice Mayor Cote-d'or, Communauté urbaine du Grand Dijon:

He appears to be "Dijon representative councillor for heritage, networks (concessionaires and régies), the environment and household waste".

M. Abdelkader Makhlouf, Conseiller, France urbaine:

Too many people on the internet have that name to identify him with any confidence.

Feb 20, 2018 at 8:00 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association des Enseignants des Sciences, de la Vie et de la Terre sent 2 delegates to COP23. Its website can be found here:

http://www.aesvt-maroc.com/en/

English version:

"The Association of Earth, Life and Sciences Teachers (AELST) was created in 1994. It is a non-profit association, constituted of a network of 35 sections everywhere in Morocco, grouping more than 2000 active members, but also 10.000 volunteers and leading a network of 18 Centers of education to the environment (CEE)

Through its various national and local programs and projects, AESVT MAROC aims to promote scientific culture in environmental education, health and sustainable development."

Perhaps inevitably, its partners include WWF. They do seem to be rather climate change obsessed, so it's almost a surprise that they sent just 2 delegates. who are:

Mr. Omar El ouidadi, member; and

Mr. Alifriqui Mohamed, Coordinateur National Changement Climatique:

He appears to be a co-author, inter alia, of "Mediterranean forests, land use and climate change: A socio-ecological perspective." Par for the course among those attending COP23, I suppose.

Feb 21, 2018 at 7:54 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association Femmes Bladi pour le Développement et le Tourisme sent 4 delegates to COP23. This is their website:

https://femmesbladi.wordpress.com/

The first thing that appears on it is a story under the headline (no thanks, as ever, to google translate for its translation) "Women Bladi was well present in Bonn at COP23." It starts by telling us this:

"The bladi women association for development and tourism is among the few Moroccan associations that are accredited by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change." Why the accreditation? Is there money in it? I confess I struggle with an organisation that believes fervently in man-made climate change and wants to fight it, while wanting to encourage tourism. How do they think the tourists will get there? Calling it sustainable tourism isn't really enough, is it?

"It is noted that the association has given accreditations to Moroccan and foreign partners, to enable them to participate in this COP23." How does that work? Get Accreditation yourself, and you can accredit others?

"The association women bladi was represented by its Environmental Club President and five other members at this COP, the association has reuusi [?] of its messages to different officials and negotiators." Which is odd, since the official list of attendees suggests there were 4 of them. Speaking of whom:

Ms. Samia El Baouchi, Presidente:

"Its president Mrs. Samia El Baouchi who is the vice president of the largest network for the deffence of the climate, CAN AW, as well as the other members of executive office were very effective during this COP23 and met different responsibles of the Arab countries, to better know everyone's policies."

Mr. Mohammed Drafat, Président Club De L'environnement. Secrétaire Général (good to see a man representing a women's group!)

He seems to be a serial attender:

"The association network of the city of Sefrou is determined to contribute to the success of the COP 22 scheduled for November in Marrakech, said the president of the environment club of the association Women-Bladi for development and tourism, Mohammed Drafat. "Our presence at the Marrakesh COP as an observer alongside non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) is a great honor for the association, which designs concrete actions in favor of the environment", he told the MAP. He added that the participation of the association in the Blue Flag of COP 22 is also a great recognition for the work of Moroccan associations. Indeed,

The club has submitted its file to participate, as an observer, in a session of the Conference of the Parties taking part in the Marrakech COP, he said, adding that the file, which includes the flagship actions of the association, has been admitted with those of other bodies which will have to appoint representatives to attend the sessions of the bodies established under the Convention or to request the organization of an exhibition. The association will also be present at the Green Pavilion of civil society alongside the Moroccan Collective for Climate and Sustainability which includes 25 associations."

Mr. Saad Y.M.Jaradat, Président, Itijah NGO:

From Wikipedia:

"Ittijah or "Union of Arab Community-Based Associations" is a network for Palestinian non-governmental organizations (NGOs) founded in 1995 in Israel. The organization's stated goals are promoting Palestinian Arab civil society and advocating political, economic and social change for Palestinians who are denied access to infrastructure and services "due to discriminatory practices and policies of the (Israeli) State".

Ittijah, based in Haifa, is dedicated to coordinating activities and strategies of member organizations while fostering advocacy, capacity-building, and networking.

Ittijah's advocacy efforts concentrate on building awareness of the social, political and economic needs of Palestinian Arabs at the (inter-Palestinian), regional (Arab) and international levels. Advocacy is directed at governments, civil society groups, donor agencies, other indigenous peoples and human rights agencies, unions, and Palestinian solidarity groups. Ittijah hosts regular Ambassadorial study days and solidarity delegations, produces fact sheet publications, and arranges conferences and meetings.

Ittijah's capacity building efforts strive to increase the human, technical, financial and educational resources of its member organizations. Ittijah places international volunteers with local organizations and provides translation assistance with English language correspondence.

Ittijah's networking efforts are engaged at the grassroots through international levels extending from field-based networking with women's and youth groups at the local level through regional inter-Arab and international levels. Particular attention is paid to developing a network of specialists engaged in building civil society infrastructure, communication and cooperation. Ittijah's helped create the "Youth Network," a collaboration between ten Community-based Associations that involved in a year-long project with participating Palestinian youth from diverse regions."

Which is all well and good, but it's a difficult to see what that has to do with the women of Bladi and their "sustainable" tourism.

Ms. Essia Guezzi, présidente, Earth Hour Tunisia, Earth Hour:

IN addition, she seems to be (surprise, surprise) Project Assistant WWF North Africa/Living Planet Tunisia.

Feb 23, 2018 at 8:09 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association Française des Entreprises pour l'Environnement sent 3 delegates to COP23. Their website is here:

https://www.actu-environnement.com/ae/dictionnaire_environnement/definition/association_francaise_des_entreprises_pour_l_environnement_afepe.php4

"French Association of Enterprises for the Environment (AFEPE)
Often called Business for the Environment, or EPE.

Association of some forty French and international companies committed to working together to better take into account the environment in their strategies and day-to-day management.

They work around joint work on environmental issues:
• energy and climate change,
• environmental health,
• biodiversity,
• environmental prospective,
• environmental management methods

It is the French partner of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development ( WBCSD)."

Their site has lots of articles, like this one:

"Renewable energy: Europe can go beyond its objectives
The European Union can reach or exceed its target of 27% renewable energy in 2030, accelerating the deployment of solar and wind, but also renewable heat, believes the International Agency for ENR."

Delegates:

Mme Claire Tutenuit:

"Former student of the Ecole Normale Supérieure, Claire Tutenuit is a mathematician, laureate of the IEP-Paris and engineer at the Corps des Mines. After 5 years at the Ministry of Industry and 15 years in business in the sectors of environment and energy (Veolia) and high technologies (Matra), she is since 2001 independent consultant in strategy and organization in the same sectors. Since 2006, she has headed Enterprise for the Environment, an association of large companies that share the vision of the environment as a source of progress and opportunities, and work together to better take it into account in their strategies and day-to-day management ( www. .epe-asso.org ), while pursuing consulting activities. EpE is the partner in France of the WBCSD." [From a website which translates as "Let's talk about the climate together!"].

M. Jean-Dominique Senard, Michelin:

He has his own Wikipedia page:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Dominique_Senard

"Jean-Dominique Senard (born 7 March 1953) is a French industrialist in the automobile industry. On 11 May 2012, he succeeded Michel Rollier as chief executive officer of the Michelin tire company after joining the company as Chief Financial Officer in 2005. Senard is the first Michelin CEO not related to the Michelin family."

Elsewhere:

"“Michelin is taking action on climate because it is absolutely at the core of its purpose,” Jean-Dominique Senard CEO of Michelin said at COP23 in Bonn....

MICHELIN’S ROLE: SHOW THE WAY...
Respecting the commitments of the COP21 in the field of transport, which represents 15% of carbon emissions, means reducing vehicle fuel consumption and also generalizing “clean” solutions such as electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cells.

Michelin and hydrogen:
As a major operator in sustainable mobility, Michelin is convinced that hydrogen is essential to quickly roll-out carbon-free transportation. In this regard, hydrogen technology is a key part of Michelin’s sustainable growth strategy: in terms of tire services and solutions, through the maintenance for these new vehicles, particularly for fleets, and also in the group’s materials expertise as the hydrogen battery is a mass of high-tech materials. Since 2014, the Group has been a shareholder of Symbio FCell, a pioneer of the fuel cell and inventor of the first battery life extender for hybrid vehicles (electricity - hydrogen). In 2016, Engie joined Michelin as Symbio FCell shareholders. Michelin has already accrued expertise in these technologies and plans to go much farther."

M. Emmanuel Martinez, Société Générale:

"October 2016 - Climate commitments: Societe Generale announces the end of financing dedicated to coal and reinforces its support for renewable energies
On the eve of the Conference of the Parties (COP22), and in line with its commitments made at COP 21, Societe Generale announces the end of financing dedicated to coal activities and the reinforcement of its commitment to renewable energies. The bank thus conforms to the scenario of the International Energy Agency (IEA), aimed at limiting the global warming of our planet to 2 degrees Celsius.

Societe Generale is pursuing its commitment to the energy transition, and announces the end of all new financing for coal-fired power plant projects or related infrastructure, all over the world. This decision will take effect on January 1, 2017.

This announcement reinforces the decisions made in 2015 to stop funding for coal mine development projects and coal-fired power project financing in high-income OECD countries.

These changes are reflected in the Group's sectoral policies, Coal Mines and Thermal Power Plants, which set the framework for Societe Generale's financial services offerings in the sectors in which the bank operates.

The bank will also reduce its outstanding loans to the coal industry, with the objective of reducing the share of coal in the electricity production financed by the bank to 19% by the end of 2020 , in line with the 2 degrees scenario. of the IEA."

Feb 24, 2018 at 7:23 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association La Voûte Nubienne [The Nubian Vault] sent 2 delegates to COP 23. Their website is here:

http://www.lavoutenubienne.org/

"ince 2000, the ambition of the Association la Voûte Nubienne is to develop a housing market adapted in West Africa by integrating the issues of housing, vocational training, economy, environment and climate. At the center of the program, an architectural concept both ancestral and innovative: the Nubian Vault. This constructive technique without wood or sheet metal uses raw earth as material and allows the professional training of a local workforce and often precarious to a profession of the future. The result ? Access to the population to affordable and adapted buildings, comfortable and resistant the consequences of climate change, the creation of green jobs, the strengthening of economies at all scales and the development of a "adapted housing" sector in a green economy.

Deployed in five countries and boasting an average annual growth of 32%, the program, run by 67 mostly African employees and carried out in collaboration with numerous local partners, has enabled, since its creation, 2,500 projects in 970 localities. , benefiting more than 30,000 people , the training and access to employment of 720 apprentices, masons, masons and contractors , saving 75,000 tons of CO2 and the reinjection of 3 million euros in circuit local."

Delegates:

Mme Cécilia Rinaudo, Deputy Director, Herault:

"As the Deputy Director of the Nubian Vault Association (AVN), I manage the organization's strategy, business development, advocacy, fundraising, and operations. AVN is a non-profit organization aimed at improving the living and economic conditions of the Sahelian population by implementing a holistic approach of the housing issue (A Roof, A Skill, A Market), through an appropriate housing alternative called the Nubian Vault. The Nubian Vault Association enables access to bioclimatic buildings and green jobs, to create a green economy in West Africa through local appropriation and empowerment.
Areas of expertise - Sustainability Themes
Climate Change, Ecosystems & Natural Resources, Poverty eradication
Sectors of activity - Buildings and construction,
Regions - Africa"

Ms. Amarys Preuss, Development Officer:

"Amarys Preuss is a Development Officer with Nubian Vault Association. Amarys is an international law, human rights and public administration graduate, I put my skills and enthusiasm to the service of non-profit organisations, through project development, grant writing and/or monitoring and evaluation.

Nubian Vault Associate promotes the development of a self-sustaining market in Nubian Vault construction, by facilitating the recruitment, on-site training, and support of village masons in several West African countries (Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, Benin…). Their local teams and extension agents pump-prime and enable the growth of indigenous markets in Nubian Vault construction, providing employment opportunities, access to decent housing, and the growth of local economic circuits. "

Full interview with here, here:

https://impactdesignhub.org/2017/08/11/interview-nubian-vault/

Feb 25, 2018 at 7:08 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association Marocaine pour la Protection des Aires Marines et Développement Durablesent one delegate to COP23. If you use Facebook, you can find them here (I can't access it, as I don't have a Facebook account):

https://fr-fr.facebook.com/AMPMorocco/

Delegate:

Mr. Abderrafie Darhouane, Student - his internet profile is light, and as I don't use Linkedin, I can find nothing to add.

Feb 26, 2018 at 7:06 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association of American Geographers sent 6 delegates to COP 23. So far as I can tell from an internet search, it's actual title is American Association of Geographers, in which case its website is here:

http://www.aag.org/

"he American Association of Geographers (AAG) is a nonprofit scientific and educational society founded in 1904. For more than 100 years the AAG has contributed to the advancement of geography. Its members from nearly 100 countries share interests in the theory, methods, and practice of geography, which they cultivate through the AAG's Annual Meeting, scholarly journals (Annals of the American Association of Geographers, The Professional Geographer, the AAG Review of Books and GeoHumanities), and the online AAG Newsletter.

The AAG promotes discussion among its members and with scholars in related fields, in part through the activities of its affinity groups and more than 60 specialty groups. The meetings and activities of our regional divisions provide the opportunity to network with colleagues near you.

Who are AAG members?
AAG members are geographers and related professionals who work in the public, private, and academic sectors. They work in a wide range of careers, as community college instructors, federal, state and local government employees, planners, cartographers, scientists, non-profit workers, entrepreneurs, businesspeople, elementary and secondary educators, graduate students, retirees, university administrators, and so on from all over the world.

More than 300 volunteer leaders serve on our AAG Council and our many other committees and groups. You can join the AAG as an individual member or as a corporate organization."

Search its website for climate change, and there's lot to see, e.g.:

"The American Association of Geographers (AAG) opposes the Trump Administration’s decision to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement. Climate change constitutes a major threat to the Earth’s environment and to the well-being of people in all nations and there is a substantial body of evidence that global climate change is driven by human-induced causes.

Geographers carry out integrative research on human-environment relations and interactions that has helped inform this worldwide scientific consensus. In 2006, the AAG adopted a resolution urging the U.S. Government to take a leadership role in addressing climate change, support open scientific debate about the issue, and develop sound policies to attenuate greenhouse gas emissions. Accordingly, we are gravely discouraged by the Administration’s decision to move in the opposite direction.

Global climate change will not reverse itself without serious, sustained leadership from every nation in the world community. Its impacts on human health, world hunger, international conflicts, and macroeconomics will steadily grow unless meaningful action is taken to lessen its profound effects. The United States is a major contributor to worldwide carbon dioxide emissions and today’s announcement is a significant blow to efforts to stem the tide of climate change."

Delegates:

Mr. Scott Stephenson, Assistant Professor, Geography, University of Connecticut:

"My research interests lie at the intersection of environmental change and human political and economic systems. Within this broad theme, my work focuses on projects relating to human causes of and responses to climate change in the Arctic, and international negotiations on climate mitigation, adaptation, and vulnerability. A major strand of my research explores future shipping scenarios for the Arctic with a focus on extractive resource economies, GHG and particulate emissions, and hazard risk mitigation. As a geographer, I seek to emphasize the spatial and multiscalar dimensions of environmental change while bridging methodological and philosophical divides between the social and physical sciences. One of the key implications of climate change in the Arctic is that its impacts will be felt both locally and globally, involving complex feedbacks unique to the region and driven by global economics. I believe that geographical research will achieve its greatest relevance if framed in this multiscalar perspective. Over the next few years I am interested in recruiting students with interests in linked human-environment systems and geospatial analysis."

Ms. Chelsea Lissette Cervantes de Blois, PhD Student, Geography, Environment, & Society:

University of Minnesota:

"Chelsea was admitted for the Fall 2014 semester, but deferred admission to accept the Fulbright in Azerbaijan (2014-2015). Before starting the PhD program she worked as an independent Agricultural Consultant in Serbia and Kyrgyzstan. Chelsea is a Minnesota Population Center (MPC) Graduate Trainee (admitted Fall 2016, MPC bio: https://pop.umn.edu/staff/chelsea-cervantes-de-blois). She was also a MPC Diversity Fellowship recipient (awarded 2016) and worked on the Terra-Populus project: data on population and environment. Her research involves the application of GISciences, regional knowledge, and ethnography to research land-cover changes, migration, and humanitarian patterns and issues situated in the former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. Here is a brief article (in Russian language) about her agricultural consultant work in Kyrgyzstan".

And:

"Publications
Ozdogan, Mutlu; Yang, Yang; Allez, George; Cervantes, Chelsea. 2010. "Remote Sensing of Irrigated Agriculture: Opportunities and Challenges."Remote Sens.2, no. 9: 2274-2304 .
Chelsea Cervantes De Blois (CIAT) and Beatriz Zavariz-Romero (CIAT). World Bank; CIAT; CATIE. 2014. Climate-Smart Agriculture in Sinaloa, Mexico. CSA Country Profiles for Latin America Series. Washington D.C.: The World Bank Group.
Chelsea Cervantes De Blois (CIAT) and Beatriz Zavariz-Romero (CIAT). World Bank; CIAT; CATIE. 2014. Climate-Smart Agriculture in Chiapas, Mexico. CSA Country Profiles for Latin America Series. Washington D.C.: The World Bank Group.
Beatriz Zavariz-Romero (CIAT) and Chelsea Cervantes De Blois (CIAT). World Bank; CIAT; CATIE. 2014. Climate-Smart Agriculture in Mexico. CSA Country Profiles for Latin America Series. Washington D.C.: The World Bank Group."

Ms. Logan Gerber-Chavez, Graduate Assistant, Geography and Environmental Sustainability:

"M.S. Student in Geography

Teaching Assistant

Degrees: Geography, Meteorology, and Political Science, Texas A&M University (2014)

Area of Research: Disasters, Climatology, and International Policy".

Ms. Katrin Schwaiger, PhD Student, Geography:

Difficult to trace with confidence online. She may be at Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich.

Ms. Kimberley Thomas, Assistant Professor, Geography:

I believe this is probably her:

"Kimberley [Weersing] Thomas is an assistant professor of geography at Penn State University. She applies her training as a human-environment geographer and biological oceanographer toward research and teaching about the socio-political drivers of environmental change at multiple scales. In addition to teaching courses on resource governance and environmental politics, she conducts research on transboundary water governance and climate change adaptation in South and Southeast Asia. Her work on water politics and international development in the Ganges and Mekong Deltas examines resource conflicts, human vulnerability to environmental hazards, land-use change, and power dynamics between state and non-state actors."

Mr. Jonathan Winter, Assistant Professor, Geography:

"A critical forum for addressing climate change globally is the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Each year students, alumni, and faculty attend the Conference of the Parties (COP) to raise awareness of the impacts of climate change on marginalized communities and younger generations, communicate important scientific findings, observe the global negotiation process, and advocate for global policy changes. This past winter, Assistant Professor of Geography, Jonathan Winter, attended COP 23 in Bonn, Germany as part of the American Association of Geographers observer delegation. Winter's experience is covered in the linked Dartmouth Now article and he also offered further insight on how students can continue to connect to this forum for climate change action below:

How can Dartmouth students support climate change action within the institution?

Students can engage with the issue of climate change at Dartmouth through student organizations, taking classes on climate change, and getting involved in climate change research. Student organizations, including those focused on environmental issues such as the Sustainability Office and Dartmouth Council on Climate Change, as well as others that might be less directly related such as the Dartmouth Political Times or The Dartmouth, can play a role in raising awareness about climate issues . By taking classes and contributing to research on climate change at Dartmouth you vote with your feet. When classes fill up and students are demanding research opportunities in a particular field or topic, departments respond.


How can Dartmouth students be engaged in international climate policy from Hanover?

Vote for a president and congress that believe in and are concerned about climate change. You or I can attend the UN Climate Change Conference as an observer, but the real power is held by the negotiators from each country and the governments behind them. You can advocate through your elected representatives or at the conference itself, but again the power for international climate policy is with the negotiators.

What can Dartmouth students do to prepare themselves for this kind of work in the future?

Embrace the liberal arts education. Classifying climate change as a complex or multidimensional problem is being simplistic. If you’re interested in environmental justice or political economy, buffer your knowledge with with a class in meteorology, physical geography, or climate change. If you’re focusing on spatial analysis and climate dynamics, complement you education by learning qualitative methods or behavioral theory from a social scientist."

Feb 26, 2018 at 7:27 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association of Consulting Engineers sent one delegate to COP 23. This is their website:

https://www.acenet.co.uk/home/592

"The Association of Consulting Engineers (ACE) is the UK's leading trade association for engineering, technical and management consultancies. ACE represents over 700 member companies that cover the entire range of construction, environmental and infrastructure industry. ACE's membership includes some of the largest companies in the sector, employing several thousand employees, as well as many smaller niche firms. ACE members regularly win awards for the excellence of their work and are generally regarded as some of the best, most innovative engineering consultancies in the world.

The collective strength of ACE's membership is a powerful lobby which ensures that the voice of UK engineering consultancy is heard by Government, clients and all members of the supply chain in the UK, Europe and internationally."

A powerful lobby? Were they lobbying at COP23, or just seeing what was going on?

Delegate:

Mr. Joachim Schnurr:

"Mr Schnurr is director of the Competence Centre for Climate and Energy at GFA Consulting Group. In this function he manages projects and coordinates the company’s activities in the climate and energy sectors. During his professional career, he has dealt extensively with emission reduction activities in a number of sectors focusing on renewable energy, energy efficiency, and forestry projects. Since 2001 he has developed renewable energy and carbon financing solutions and established contacts to the private sector and political institutions. He has assisted German export initiatives for renewable energy and energy efficiency technology regarding financing opportunities, and supported implementation of renewable energy financing facilities in South Africa, Russia and Turkey. His consultancy activities also include providing policy advice on climate and energy-related issues to governments and private entities.

As a tropical forestry expert for over 25 years in Europe, Latin America, Africa and Asia, he has experience planning, operating and evaluating technical and financial co-operation projects dealing with climate change, energy and natural resource management as short-term expert, project manager and long-term resource person for professional backstopping. Mr. Schnurr has deep knowledge of the modalities and requirements of international donor agencies and international financing institutions in project management."

Yes, deep knowledge of of international donor agencies and international financing institutions is always useful...

Feb 27, 2018 at 7:31 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Association of Sustainable Ecological Engineering Development sent 3 delegates to COP 23. They appear to be based in Taiwan. I'm struggling to find their website, but on-line searches confirm that they have attended earlier COPs. I did find this:

https://international.thenewslens.com/article/22028

"Taiwanese Invents Ecological Method of Paving Roads"

"The technology allows rainwater to flow into a water tank and lets it evaporate and radiate heat during warmer weather. This prevent floods and improves the urban heat island effect."

Delegates:

Mr. Jui-Wen Chen, Chairman:

He receives an honourable mention in the book called "Patents and Climate Change: There's No Place Like Home." There's also this:

"How did people in Taipei City respond to issues dealing with heavy rainfall, droughts, or the heat island effect? Mr. Jui-Wen Chen had an awesome idea; he invented the JW Eco-Technology, which provides an effective solution the aforementioned environmental problems. Through this project, we hope that we can gain an in-depth understanding of how Mr. Chen, who had a junior high school education, became an expert on green energy. Through reading about the topic, watching videos, going on field observations, conducting interviews, surveying, and many others means of research, we will learn about Mr. Chen and how he makes “breathing roads” using his JW Eco-Technology. We will also learn how his invention can prevent flood and drought, purify the air, and regulate temperature."

Ms. Jono Chen, Secretary-General:

This is a common name online, such that I can't post anything with total confidence that I have found the correct person.

Mr. Chung-Ming Liu, Executive Director:

This might be him:

Climate Change Impact Assessment in Taiwan
Chung-Ming Liu

Feb 28, 2018 at 8:18 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Ateneo de Manila University sent 3 delegates to COP 23. Their website is here:

http://www.ateneo.edu/

It's not really a surprise they sent 3 delegates (perhaps the only surprise is that they didn't send more) given that a search of their site using the search word "climate" produces LOTS in this vein:

"CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAM
Climate change is the most pervasive environmental threat of this age. Strengthening Strenthening governance and policymaking, especially at the local level, is vital to help create climate-resilient communities.
The Ateneo School of Government, a professional school of the Ateneo de Manila University, is introducing a Climate Change, Development, and Environmental Governance Program, which aims to develop leaders in both the public and private sectors and strengthen their capabilities in formulating and implementing policies, plans, and programs to effectively address climate change.

This program is specifically designed for decision-makers and planners in government, and practitioners in the fields of:

Climate Change Policy
Environment
Agriculture & Fisheries
Coastal Resource Management
Energy
Forestry
Solid waste management
Disaster risk management
Through this Program, the School provides institutional support to Philippine national government agencies, local government units, NGOs, and private companies to build their capacities in increasing resilience and reducing vulnerabilities to the negative impact of climate change. The School also works with international and local partners on various climate change-related projects namely Clean Development Mechanisms (CDM), reduction of emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD-Plus), climate change adaptation, and disaster risk management."

Delegates:

Ms. Justine Nicole Torres, Senior Rights and Resources, Specialist, Parabukas, Inc:

https://www.parabukas.com/about-1/

"para bukas.
for tomorrow.
Aya de Leon and Niner Guiao, development lawyers from the Philippines, met as legal and policy specialists at the Ateneo School of Government in Manila. They founded Parabukas in 2015 with the vision of bringing together legal and policy expertise and a keen understanding of critical challenges related to climate, the environment, and sustainable development.

Unlike law firms in the traditional sense, Parabukas approaches the law not only in terms of litigation and case-handling, but more so by directly interacting with stakeholders and policy- and decision-makers in international, domestic, and community contexts.

The Parabukas team's combined experience spans diverse concerns including energy, forests, biodiversity resource management, mining, air and water pollution, waste management, and oceans – as well as the closely related areas of indigenous peoples' and local community rights, land tenure, gender, natural and cultural heritage, disaster risk reduction and management, urban poverty, ecotourism, governance, and access to justice."

And:

"Nicole has spent the last nine years working on rights and resource management issues. Along with engagements with indigenous peoples and local communities on mining and land tenure concerns, she built her specialization on biodiversity and human communities at the Ateneo School of Government, where she led initiatives on community tenure rights and participated in the drafting of the Philippines’ 5th National Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity. She likewise developed her expertise in REDD+, particularly the study and development of REDD+ safeguards and a safeguards information system for national-level implementation.

She has a J.D. from the University of the Philippines, and is currently pursuing a Masters in Applied Sociology and Anthropology at the Ateneo de Manila University."

Ms. Elizabeth Ann Crespo, Legal & Policy Specialist, Parabukas, Inc.:

Not a lot on the internet, other than that she seems to be a serial COP attender - photos of her on the internet at COP20 in Lima, for instance.

Mr. Andreas Yiannis Thoma, Intern, Office of the Executive Director, Manila Observatory:

This isn't obviously him, though the name is the same:

"ANDREAS YIANNIS THOMA is a Individual/Sole Trader based in or near Dover Heights, Hmas Watson & Rose Bay North in New South Wales, Australia. ANDREAS YIANNIS THOMA is a registered Australian Business Name with the Australian Business Number (ABN) of: 54263697376.
This business was first added to the ABN register on 10th February 2017 and has been trading for 1 years."

Nothing on-line that is definitely him.

Mar 1, 2018 at 2:30 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

The various Associations and the like attending COP23 have by and large appeared to be vaguely virtuous, with some even doing good work. I wonder whether they go in for the climate change thing because they believe it,or because it might unlock some funds and perhaps gain some supporters? But it's not been terribly thrilling stuff, even if it is vaguely interesting to try to find out about the sort of people who attend the COPs.

Now it gets a little more interesting. Avaaz Foundation send 3 delegates to COP23. This is their website:

https://secure.avaaz.org/page/en/

"Avaaz—meaning "voice" in several European, Middle Eastern and Asian languages—launched in 2007 with a simple democratic mission: organize citizens of all nations to close the gap between the world we have and the world most people everywhere want.

Avaaz empowers millions of people from all walks of life to take action on pressing global, regional and national issues, from corruption and poverty to conflict and climate change. Our model of internet organising allows thousands of individual efforts, however small, to be rapidly combined into a powerful collective force. (Read about results on the Highlights page.)

The Avaaz community campaigns in 15 languages, served by a core team on 6 continents and thousands of volunteers. We take action -- signing petitions, funding media campaigns and direct actions, emailing, calling and lobbying governments, and organizing "offline" protests and events -- to ensure that the views and values of the world's people inform the decisions that affect us all."

"Our Victories!

Climate Change: The Beginning of the End of Fossil Fuels

The Paris Climate Accord was the greatest victory yet in efforts to fight climate change, a beautiful achievement of human unity, and our movement was the leading global public mobilisation engine to deliver it."

How modest!

"Avaaz has been fundamental to mobilising broad support for climate action. Thank you Avaaz, you are music!"

-- Christiana Figueres, Head of UN climate talks

Delegates:

Mr. Iain Keith, Campaign Director, Climate:

This is his website:

http://iainkeith.weebly.com/about.html

"So this is me, a Scotsman who is concerned about the state of the world: environmental degradation, perpetual war, human rights abuses and Bieber. But what can I do about it all? I haven’t yet fully figured that one out. I know creating movements for change will certainly kick-start action, but I reckon everything begins by talking and that’s precisely what I intend to do on this site.

My priority global concern is climate change. I moved to NYC from the UK 3 years ago to complete a degree in Environmental Science and Policy. After graduating I worked for a very short time at the UNDP. Alas, the policy world was not for me and I have since altered course. I’m currently working for Avaaz.org a multi-issue, multi-lingual non-profit organisation that is using technology to create a movement to change the world. It’s phenomenal stuff.

Although I work on all sorts of campaigns at Avaaz, climate still grabs my attention more than other issues. Through this site, I intend to divulge my random climate-related thoughts: from policy, to politics and society. Maybe you’ll like it, maybe you won’t--but like I say, everything begins with a conversation. Welcome to my site let the chat begin! "

Ms. Fatima Ibrahim, Campaigner, Climate Action Network, International:

"The International Youth Climate Movement (IYCM) is a large group of connected friends, campaigners and optimistic humans on this earth lobbying for a fairer, cleaner and healthier world for all. The IYCM is made up of young individuals or groups working on grassroots projects, international campaigns and direct engagement with decision-makers to combat climate change and the threat it leaves millions of people world-wide. Within this movement, UKYCC’s International Team operates using engaging and fun ways for young people to take positive action, often through campaigns with coalition partners or direct involvement with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

Within the UNFCCC, Youth NGO’s have an official constituency it works with (YOUNGO) to help strengthen the overall climate movement and support the IYCM at UN negotiations each year. YOUNGO is an open and inclusive constituency which anyone can join regardless of your capacity and which operates under a democratic system with other youth groups from around the world. UKYCC’s international team works collaboratively with many youth groups worldwide and you can find a full list of these below.

If you would like any more information on international campaigns please contact
Cat Hudson
Fatima Ibrahim"

She appears to be a serial COP attender.

Mr. Christoph Schott:

"Citizens call on G19: “Don’t Trump our Planet!”

*** In a colorful demonstration, citizens call on Merkel to defend the Paris climate agreement ahead of Trump’s arrival at the G20 summit in Hamburg ***

BERLIN -- Today, European heads of state were greeted in Berlin by Avaaz members who called on them to stand strong against Donald Trump’s war on the Paris Climate Accord. In advance of the US President’s arrival at the G20, the group erected a giant globe right in front of the Chancellery surrounded by citizens dressed as G19 caped climate superheroes.

Reports suggest one of Merkel’s major goals for the summit is to bring the G20 together on an Action Plan on Climate and Energy -- a key step to ensuring global climate commitments are met -- which President Trump intends to oppose. The G19 accounts for two thirds of the world’s climate emissions, and Avaaz members intend to ensure they all sign on to the Chancellor’s Action Plan.

Christoph Schott, Campaign Director at Avaaz, said:

“After Trump pulled out of the Paris climate agreement, something historic happened -- countries from Germany to China stood up to assure the world that they would act in the planet’s interests and not bow to pressure from the US. Now G19 countries have a chance to strengthen that resolve, and put the Paris climate commitments into action with or without the US. This is their moment to send a clear message that they will not Trump our planet.”

In advance of the G20, Avaaz launched an open letter to the summit host Angela Merkel, that citizens across the globe have signed on to. The letter reads:

Dear Chancellor Merkel,

We reject Trump’s attempts to divide the world on climate change. And we call on you to lead us to a safe, sustainable future, with or without the USA. As you welcome the G20 to Germany, we ask you to stand up to Trump by leading the 19 remaining countries to commit to a 100% clean energy future. As the ‘Climate Chancellor’, your leadership has given us hope that climate catastrophe can be avoided. That hope is precious. Billions across our beautiful planet are now counting on you to protect it.

Despite the US’s backsliding on climate action, 2016 saw record investments in renewables globally, up 9 percent from the year before. At the same time, solar is on its way to being cheaper than coal worldwide by 2025, and both India and China are set to reach their climate goals early."

I'm just surprised they only sent 3 delegates!

Mar 2, 2018 at 8:09 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Avelife (Ltd.) sent 2 delegates to COP23. Their website is here:

http://www.avelife.org/index.html

They are a very small foundation, incorporated by guarantee, in Singapore, and seemingly doing god work, albeit on a very small scale. The most recent accounts on their website are 5 years old, but show net current assets in 2012 of just over $20,000, rising to just over $35,000 in 2013. No doubt they would disagree, but I struggle to see on what basis such a small outfit with such limited funds can justify the cost of sending 2 delegates to COP23 (unless someone else is paying, of course...).

Delegates:

Mr Matthias Gelber. This is his website:

http://www.greenmanspeaks.com/#green-man-matthias-gelber

"AVID ENVIRONMENTALIST
Matthias Gelber comes from Burbach-Lippe, a small German village surrounded by the forest. He developed a strong connection with nature from a young age, and has been a passionate advocate of green living ever since. In 2008, he was voted ‘Greenest Person on the Planet’ in an online competition by 3rdWhale in Canada. Matthias lives in Malaysia without a car and a monthly USD$10 electricity bill. He also started Eco Warriors Malaysia, a community movement focused on taking positive action to combat climate change.

GREEN ENTREPRENEUR
Matthias graduated with Masters in Environmental Science from Brunel University in the UK and went on to start a successful environmental consulting company in 1999. In 2007, he co-founded Maleki GmbH, a German company specialising in high performance, low carbon footprint construction materials. He also serves as a Board Member of Solexel Malaysia Sdn Bhd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Solexel Inc in Silicon Valley.

PROFESSIONAL SPEAKER AND TRAINER
Matthias is also a consummate speaker and trainer on environmental issues, and is often seen giving green talks to corporates, government organisations and schools in the South East Asian region.

Matthias has recently published his first book, “the greenman’s guide to green living and working.”"

Ms. Cuifen Pui:

"Humans of COP: A brief Q&A with people met at COP23.
Q: Please tell me about yourself.

A: Hello! My name is Cuifen. I have been an environmental scientist with DHI, a global environmental not-for-profit for the last 15 years. In my day job with DHI, I help leaders make better decisions that they can communicate with confidence by transforming knowledge grounded in good science into visuals and information that they can relate to and analyze. My first degree was in biology, and so when I first started out, I had the opportunity to conduct surveys in mangroves and other forests, as well as the marine waters. I worked a lot on environmental assessment and monitoring projects and more recently shifted into climate change and disaster risk projects.

A few years into my career, I decided to take a gap year to do Masters in Applied Environmental Science in Australia. I totally loved what I was learning and experiencing, and this helped me understand the why we do what we do at DHI. I signed up for various things I didn’t imagine I would get into. One of these was a 2-week Youth Encounter with Sustainability Course, which helped me connect the dots, re-learn what I thought I already knew, gained a lot of new perspectives and understanding. A huge part of this was the exposure to classmates from all around the world, realizing we are so similar and yet different, hearing their stories and being inspired by what other youths are doing.

When I was doing my Masters, I also came across a street of edible gardens, that totally took my breath away and helped me internalize a lot of what I was experiencing and learning. You know, it is the moment the lightning hits, and you kind of gain “enlightenment”. I started Googling about the edible gardens street and was inspired by what I saw. I started going to talks etc to gain new knowledge in a more conscious way, rather than just being a participant. I was still not ready to take any action, but I was really curious and ready to learn.

When I came back to Singapore, I continued my learnings by going to Green Drinks Singapore monthly talks and joining Nature Society (Singapore) on walks/learning opportunities. It helped me find a bit of what I valued in Australia here in Singapore, and also gain broader perspectives and understanding on who and what is in Singapore’s environmental landscape.

I had the opportunity to create my vision of edible garden with my neighbors. This led me to create Foodscape Collective, after learning that people in Singapore hold so many stories and knowledge of our foodscape. After much ground-up work, I felt very much in tune with what me, my neighbors, the people I met want.

I started wondering what the policy makers / global leaders negotiate for when they make decisions and agreements about our collective future. My interest was especially sparked when in 2015, I joined ASEAN Power Shift as a policy delegate (despite knowing nuts about policy) and doing a 1-month climate perception survey focusing on youths. In a few weeks, we had ~200 responses, many of them youths (the non-youths do want to have their say also!). Many of them were less than 15 years old, and a 10-year-old called me to say how she spent 45 minutes working on it because she really wanted her voice heard. I wanted to find my way to COP21 to hear what our Singapore leaders and global leaders say, and especially to tell our local leaders what the youths, especially the younger ones, want them to hear.

So, a couple of months before COP21, Lastrina who organized ASEAN Power Shift contacted me and said there is an opportunity to do so. We just need to start a network of climate change-focused youth leaders here in Singapore. As we discussed and Melissa came on board also, we started thinking of “Singapore Youth for Climate Action” as a name for this network. With the support of Mark of Avelife Foundation and various individuals, we made our plans to go. Lastrina contacted the Minister; I got in touch with the negotiators. Just before we boarded the plane, we launched the SYCA FB page.

Q: What inspired you to be involved in the fight against climate change?

A: I think the sustainability course, as well as some coaching courses I took to build the courage to live life the way I want to, really made a difference. It has been a bit of a balancing act though – there are opportunities where I could speak up from a citizen / civil society/youth perspective, that I choose to give up given my role in the environmental sector. Must one’s passions remain separate from what we do at work so that we can clearly differentiate what a person says in the context of work/industry / civil society/citizen? These are questions I still ask.

Q: Could you highlight one of the projects you or your organization is involved right now?

A: This year is the Singapore Year of Climate Action, and we have been actively engaging various people in the Government Agencies on climate action-related initiatives. For SYCA, we are curating a second round of Learning and Learning Program.

We are also preparing a write-up of our COP22 experience, and hope to share that publicly on end Feb. At this point, SYCA team (7 of us) have our own initiatives that are inspired by what we learned through SYCA or other initiatives. Pamela has just started Tingkat Heroes and is collaborating with her university and secondary school, food stalls, retailers and civil-society organizations to bring about a huge change in use of disposables by ~10,000 students. Jeremy is looking to create Skillsfuture courses that the public could sign up for, to learn about various aspects of climate action in Singapore context. Lastrina is starting a reading club (need to learn more about this myself).

For me, I am working on an “Environmental Day” in my neighborhood. Besides that, I am also talking to artists to see how we can convey climate stories in a way that people can really understand right away (still exploring).

Q: What is your typical day at COP? Are there any topics you are following in this COP? Can you highlight some similarity and/differences between COP23 and your previous cop?

A: I have attended COP21, COP22, and COP23. Each COP has been a hugely different experience for me.

COP21

I wanted to follow negotiations and was very frustrated when I couldn’t understand what they were discussing on, and especially so when they can “quarrel” over the same paragraph for an entire afternoon. I started going to side events and realized that a lot of what I do at the workplace is being showcased at COP21, just by other organizations. I was especially thankful that farmers were there (first COP that farmers got to represent themselves), indigenous people were there, tribal leaders were there…

I was especially thankful to Mel Low, fellow Singaporean from Energy Studies Institute, for helping me to understand what was discussed, and leading by example on what a youth actively following negotiations can achieve. I was especially happy that I helped my team and other Singaporeans to connect with and learn from our local negotiators. I was also thankful that I talked to random people in the bus etc, for many of these people are from places I may never have heard of or thought to connect (e.g. Ministers), and learned so much just by interacting with them, listening to their stories, and capturing their 1-min videos.

#MYD, MYD2017, YOUNGO
Humans of COP: Cuifen Pui
26 January, 2018
Facebook15TwitterWhatsAppLinkedIn
Humans of COP: A brief Q&A with people met at COP23.
Q: Please tell me about yourself.

A: Hello! My name is Cuifen. I have been an environmental scientist with DHI, a global environmental not-for-profit for the last 15 years. In my day job with DHI, I help leaders make better decisions that they can communicate with confidence by transforming knowledge grounded in good science into visuals and information that they can relate to and analyze. My first degree was in biology, and so when I first started out, I had the opportunity to conduct surveys in mangroves and other forests, as well as the marine waters. I worked a lot on environmental assessment and monitoring projects and more recently shifted into climate change and disaster risk projects.


Cuifen has a multifaceted involvement in the climate change scene.

A few years into my career, I decided to take a gap year to do Masters in Applied Environmental Science in Australia. I totally loved what I was learning and experiencing, and this helped me understand the why we do what we do at DHI. I signed up for various things I didn’t imagine I would get into. One of these was a 2-week Youth Encounter with Sustainability Course, which helped me connect the dots, re-learn what I thought I already knew, gained a lot of new perspectives and understanding. A huge part of this was the exposure to classmates from all around the world, realizing we are so similar and yet different, hearing their stories and being inspired by what other youths are doing.

When I was doing my Masters, I also came across a street of edible gardens, that totally took my breath away and helped me internalize a lot of what I was experiencing and learning. You know, it is the moment the lightning hits, and you kind of gain “enlightenment”. I started Googling about the edible gardens street and was inspired by what I saw. I started going to talks etc to gain new knowledge in a more conscious way, rather than just being a participant. I was still not ready to take any action, but I was really curious and ready to learn.

When I came back to Singapore, I continued my learnings by going to Green Drinks Singapore monthly talks and joining Nature Society (Singapore) on walks/learning opportunities. It helped me find a bit of what I valued in Australia here in Singapore, and also gain broader perspectives and understanding on who and what is in Singapore’s environmental landscape.

I had the opportunity to create my vision of edible garden with my neighbors. This led me to create Foodscape Collective, after learning that people in Singapore hold so many stories and knowledge of our foodscape. After much ground-up work, I felt very much in tune with what me, my neighbors, the people I met want.

I started wondering what the policy makers / global leaders negotiate for when they make decisions and agreements about our collective future. My interest was especially sparked when in 2015, I joined ASEAN Power Shift as a policy delegate (despite knowing nuts about policy) and doing a 1-month climate perception survey focusing on youths. In a few weeks, we had ~200 responses, many of them youths (the non-youths do want to have their say also!). Many of them were less than 15 years old, and a 10-year-old called me to say how she spent 45 minutes working on it because she really wanted her voice heard. I wanted to find my way to COP21 to hear what our Singapore leaders and global leaders say, and especially to tell our local leaders what the youths, especially the younger ones, want them to hear.

So, a couple of months before COP21, Lastrina who organized ASEAN Power Shift contacted me and said there is an opportunity to do so. We just need to start a network of climate change-focused youth leaders here in Singapore. As we discussed and Melissa came on board also, we started thinking of “Singapore Youth for Climate Action” as a name for this network. With the support of Mark of Avelife Foundation and various individuals, we made our plans to go. Lastrina contacted the Minister; I got in touch with the negotiators. Just before we boarded the plane, we launched the SYCA FB page.


Cuifen is one of the founder of SYCA.

Q: What inspired you to be involved in the fight against climate change?

A: I think the sustainability course, as well as some coaching courses I took to build the courage to live life the way I want to, really made a difference. It has been a bit of a balancing act though – there are opportunities where I could speak up from a citizen / civil society/youth perspective, that I choose to give up given my role in the environmental sector. Must one’s passions remain separate from what we do at work so that we can clearly differentiate what a person says in the context of work/industry / civil society/citizen? These are questions I still ask.

Q: Could you highlight one of the projects you or your organization is involved right now?

A: This year is the Singapore Year of Climate Action, and we have been actively engaging various people in the Government Agencies on climate action-related initiatives. For SYCA, we are curating a second round of Learning and Learning Program.

We are also preparing a write-up of our COP22 experience, and hope to share that publicly on end Feb. At this point, SYCA team (7 of us) have our own initiatives that are inspired by what we learned through SYCA or other initiatives. Pamela has just started Tingkat Heroes and is collaborating with her university and secondary school, food stalls, retailers and civil-society organizations to bring about a huge change in use of disposables by ~10,000 students. Jeremy is looking to create Skillsfuture courses that the public could sign up for, to learn about various aspects of climate action in Singapore context. Lastrina is starting a reading club (need to learn more about this myself).

For me, I am working on an “Environmental Day” in my neighborhood. Besides that, I am also talking to artists to see how we can convey climate stories in a way that people can really understand right away (still exploring).

Q: What is your typical day at COP? Are there any topics you are following in this COP? Can you highlight some similarity and/differences between COP23 and your previous cop?

A: I have attended COP21, COP22, and COP23. Each COP has been a hugely different experience for me.

COP21

I wanted to follow negotiations and was very frustrated when I couldn’t understand what they were discussing on, and especially so when they can “quarrel” over the same paragraph for an entire afternoon. I started going to side events and realized that a lot of what I do at the workplace is being showcased at COP21, just by other organizations. I was especially thankful that farmers were there (first COP that farmers got to represent themselves), indigenous people were there, tribal leaders were there…

I was especially thankful to Mel Low, fellow Singaporean from Energy Studies Institute, for helping me to understand what was discussed, and leading by example on what a youth actively following negotiations can achieve. I was especially happy that I helped my team and other Singaporeans to connect with and learn from our local negotiators. I was also thankful that I talked to random people in the bus etc, for many of these people are from places I may never have heard of or thought to connect (e.g. Ministers), and learned so much just by interacting with them, listening to their stories, and capturing their 1-min videos.

COP22

I was busy working on projects for my day job and wasn’t able to fully participate in the ongoings of COP22. There was so much I missed! I was really thankful to speak on behalf of UNEP-DHI on water projects that were carried out in Africa region. This was one of the few opportunities that helped me to try to understand how my work / personal interest can sometimes collide, and support one another. Because of this, I connected more with the Africa leaders

COP23

I was still a little unsure of what I wanted to focus on really. I decided on the first day to follow a series of APA discussions, as limited passes were available at the RINGOs daily meetings. RINGOs is a “home base” of researchers, scientists, educators. Although SYCA is about youth empowerment, we are also about inclusivity and following areas that are your personal strengths/passions. I felt that I wanted to give RINGOs a try as they fit better with my sense of work/personal identity. Turns out, although the other Observer organizations also have passed to the APA discussions, RINGOs was the only constituency that encouraged people with passes to give back by taking notes. My initial notes were not that great, they put it up on RINGOs website anyway. Other RINGOs members told me how useful the notes were, especially if they were not able to attend the session. This helped me to want to go to the discussions, take good notes, understand what is discussed, and share with others. I realized that although I still don’t know everything (and sometimes do go into the wrong rooms), I had come a long way from when I first started in COP21. The note-taking also sparked an interest in draft interventions on behalf of RINGOs, and in particular, to present at the APA closing meeting. The drafting process, which included reading and contributing to other interventions done on behalf of RINGOs worldwide, was one of my major highlights for COP23.

At all 3 COPs, we met with the Singapore negotiators and Minister. I’m still trying to learn how best to engage them (as we didn’t want them to meet us, only to have yet another coffee shop chat). I feel encouraged by the interactions we have, and also how Singapore has positioned herself to take climate action seriously from 2018 onwards.

Q: What are the key messages you would like to share with youths in general?

A: Growing up and even up to my mid-20s, I had no clue on what I wanted to do with life. I was merely following the crowd. If my friends like steak at a certain restaurant, I would want to go there too. If there was a leather bag that a popular girl in school was carrying, I wanted an exact same too. This was quite ok for a while until it came to a point – I realized I was not living to the values I hold to be important, I felt my voice to be not important. So even though I had friends, I felt I didn’t have anyone to truly turn to. Taking climate action is one of the “what” I chose to do, after realising what I hold important to me. There is still a way to go. I may have started 4 community initiatives, but there are so many more things to learn, to be, to unlearn.

Everyone is on a personal journey, and where you are at right now is OK. Understand what you hold important, where you want to be, and know that there will be roadblocks ahead that you can and will overcome. Have the resources you need with you, and have good relationships with people you meet. No matter what, remember your health comes first! I realized this the hard way last year when my health really suffered. It is a huge challenge to live to your “responsibilities” and other commitments you may have. Take care of yourself, be a leading example of what it means to truly live a sustainable life starting with you and the steps you can take to move forward.

Content and Media Provided by Cuifen Pui"

Mar 3, 2018 at 7:52 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies sent 4 delegates to COP 23. Their website is here:

www.bcas.net/

(But it doesn't seem to be working on my computer this evening).

Wikipedia offers us this:

"Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS) is a think tank in Bangladesh working to develop national capabilities in addressing resource management, environment and development (RMED) issues by use of existing intellectual, technology and manpower. It was set up in 1984 by Dr.Saleemul Huq who became the first Executive Director of the organization. BCAS addresses sustainable development through four interactive themes:

Environment-development integration
Good governance and people's participation
Poverty alleviation and sustainable livelihoods
Economic growth and public-private partnership.

BCAS is a part of the National Environmental Action Plan, particularly in the areas of ozone depletion, fisheries management, social forestry and coastal zone management, and the Dhaka Municipal Management Reforms project. It serves as the international secretariat for both the Global Forum on Environment and Poverty, constituted at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 by over 400 NGOs, and the Climate Action Network for South Asia and is an active participant in the Global Environmental Facility. It has also worked for and received funding from Ford Foundation, NORAD, USAID, DANIDA, CIDA, WHO, UNDP and ADB. It also maintains a close link with the University of California, Berkeley; Yale University; Agricultural University, Norway; Sanford Flaming College, Canada; IIED, London; and IUCN, Geneva.

As of 2007, the Centre has 112 full-time staff (26 senior, 28 mid-level and 46 junior professionals), and has four field offices in Khulna, Faridpur, Jessore and Rajshahi lying outside its Dhaka headquarter."

Delegates:

Mr. Atiqur Rahman, Executive Director, Climate Change:

"Dr A. Atiq Rahman is a global leader in the fields of sustainable development, environment, poverty and climate change. In 2008 he received the UN ‘Champion of the Earth’ award for his distinguished leadership in global environmental issues. As one of the lead authors of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), he was a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2008 he was awarded ‘Paribesh Padak’, the highest national environmental achievement award in Bangladesh, for his contribution in environmental technology and innovation.

Dr Rahman is the Executive Director of Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS) and a lead author of the chapter titled ‘Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and the Risk from Climate Change’ in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). He had a key role in the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee (INC) at the UNCED Conference in Rio, 1992 and in all the Conferences of Parties and climate summits that led to the signing of the Kyoto Protocol 1997. He was also a lead author of the IPCC Third Assessment Report, the IPCC Special Report on Technology Transfer, and a cross-thematic paper on ‘Development, Equity and Sustainability’.

Dr Rahman is a Visiting Professor of International Diplomacy and Sustainable Development at Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, Boston, USA. He chairs the Climate Action Network South Asia (CANSA) and the Coalition of Environmental NGOs in Bangladesh. He is currently engaged in exploring global-local linkages and mega-processes such as global inequity and poverty, climate change, biodiversity, and relevant global institutions. He was the Team Leader of the National Adaptation Plan of Action (NAPA) Synthesis Group under the Government of Bangladesh."

Another one who still claims to be "a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize" I see. I thought they'd been told to stop claiming that?

Ms. Sirazoom Munira:

"Ms. Sirazoom Munira is a Senior Research Officer at the renowned policy-research institute, Bangladesh Center for Advanced Studies (BCAS). She is also an Adjunct Lecturer at the Department of Environmental Science and Management (ESM) at North South University (NSU). Ms. Munira has an outstanding academic profile. She completed her O/A Levels from Scholastica school with Honors and The Daily Star Award. In 2014, she graduated with the prestigious Summa Cum Laude Award upon the completion of her Undergraduate Degree in the discipline of Environmental Science at NSU. In 2015, she completed her Master’s program on Environmental Management at NSU and was awarded the Chancellor’s Gold Medal by the Honorable President of Bangladesh on attaining a perfect GPA of 4.0. In 2016, she was offered the prestigious Commonwealth Scholarship by the Commonwealth Scholarships Commission in the UK and such, she attained her second Masters on Risk and Environmental Hazards from Durham University. She completed this degree with an overall Distinction. Ms. Munira has experience working with the Royal Commonwealth Society (RCS) in London and is currently an active member of the Commonwealth Alumni Association in Bangladesh. Ms. Munira wants to continue working on the climate change sector in Bangladesh and envisions her country be free of poverty and hunger. She is also an occasional classical music singer and is exhibits interest in the arts."

Mr. Md Golam Rabbani, Fellow:

"Adaptation to Climate Change: Approaches and Examples from Bangladesh
Mr. Md. Golam Rabbani
Fellow, (BCAS)"

"Vulnerabilities and responses to climate change for Dhaka
Mozaharul Alam, M.D. Golam Rabbani

Abstract
The relationship between climate change and cities is complex. City-based activities contribute significant amounts of greenhouse gases and, simultaneously, are often more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Dhaka is now the world's eighth largest city and a significant proportion of Bangladesh's greenhouse gases are generated there although, relative to total emissions worldwide, the contribution is negligible. But this contribution is likely to increase rapidly with the continuing growth of the city's population, economy and electricity consumption, as well as increased motor vehicle use. At the same time, Dhaka is prone to damaging and costly flooding, both from the rivers that bound it and from rainfall that generates runoff that is beyond the capacity of the drains. In less than 20 years, the city has faced three major floods, each causing huge damage and economic loss. Although the government has taken a number of measures to improve both Dhaka's air quality and its capacity to withstand floods, there are further opportunities in both areas. This paper discusses, in specific terms, the scale of the threats, the measures taken to address them and the potential for more effective action."

Mr. Tanvir Mahmud Sohag:

Mar 4, 2018 at 7:24 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Barcelona Centre for International Affairs sent one representative to COP23. Their website is here:

https://www.cidob.org/en/

It looks a lot more interesting than many I've trawled through on this thread, not least because of the diversity of issues to which they give consideration. Wikipedia is worth a quick look to see more about them, if interested:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barcelona_Centre_for_International_Affairs

Delegate:

Mr. Luigi Carafa, Research Fellow:

"Luigi is currently the Executive Director of the Climate Infrastructure Partnership. Co-chair, Climate Futures."

I suppose, despite the variety of topics they consider, their choice of delegate to COP 23 was a bit predictable.

Mar 5, 2018 at 8:04 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Basel Agency for Sustainable Energy sent 2 delegates to COP 23. Their website is here:

http://energy-base.org/

"Around the world, we develop innovative ideas and tailored market-driven solutions to unlock private investment in sustainable energy and to meet the challenge of climate change.

BASE believes that smart business models and financing are crucial to making sustainable energy technologies competitive and attractive for investors.

We believe that every market presents sustainable energy investment opportunities, with the potential to be developed and scaled.

Established in 2001, BASE is a Swiss foundation and Specialized Partner of United Nations Environment.

BASE is a member of the Climate Technology Centre and Network, and United for Efficiency."

"FOCUS AREAS
Renewable energy
Energy efficiency
Energy poverty
Smart grids
Climate change mitigation
Climate change adaptation
Green buildings
Sustainable transport"

"OUR PROJECTS:

SCALING UP ENERGY EFFICIENCY WITH ENERGY SAVINGS INSURANCE

DIRECTING REMITTANCES TOWARDS SOLAR ENERGY IN HAITI

UNLOCKING INVESTMENTS IN SUSTAINABLE STREET LIGHTING IN COLOMBIA

DRIVING DEMAND FOR GREEN FINANCING IN MONGOLIA

REMITTANCES FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IN TAJIKISTAN & KYRGYZSTAN

SAVING ENERGY IN HOTELS AND HOSPITALS
Driving demand for energy efficiency in Colombian hotels and hospitals.

FINANCING ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN THE AGRIBUSINESS SECTOR

RENEWABLE ENERGY MINI-GRIDS IN COLOMBIA
Setting up a financing strategy to scale up investments in renewable energy-based mini grid systems in Colombia for communities not connected to the grid.

UNLOCKING PRIVATE INVESTMENTS IN ELECTRIC AND HYBRID BUSSES
Developing a green financing programme to support private companies to shift investments from diesel to electric urban busses in Bogota, Colombia.

FINANCING RURAL CLEAN ENERGY IN LATIN AMERICA

LED STREET LIGHTING IN SWITZERLAND

SOLAR WATER HEATER FINANCING THROUGH REMITTANCES IN BOLIVIA

FACILITATING GREEN PROJECT FINANCING IN BARBADOS
Connecting quality green projects with financial institutions".

And there's a lot more under the heading "other projects". Follow the money, or perhaps find the money, seems apt here.

Delegates:

Mr. Daniel Magallon, Managing Director:

"Managing Director of BASE (Basel Agency for Sustainable Energy)
BASE-greenTEK Ventures
Daniel Magallon is a sustainable energy technology, financial, and market specialist with several years of experience working for public and private organizations.
Since 2007, Mr. Magallon directs BASE’s work, A Swiss based organization focused in mobilizing investment and financing to renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate change mitigation and adaptation projects, in both industrialized and the developing world. His work has been mainly focused in developing market-based business models and financial instruments (green credit lines, green equity funds, risk mitigation instruments), and he has conducted projects in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, India, China, South Africa, Chile, Haiti, Argentina, Brazil, Nicaragua, Mexico, and other countries in Europe and North America.
Daniel Magallon is the concept originator and advisory board member of “greenTEK ventures”, is co-founder of Global Energy Basel, is advisory board member of World Climate Credits, and is advisory board member of the Global Sustainability Institute (ITESM).
Daniel Magallón holds a MSc. in Renewable Energy (The European Renewable Energy Centres Agency, Brussels, and Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain), has a specialization in hybrid systems and mini-grids (Kassel, Germany), studied a MBA with a finance specialization (ITESM, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey), and a BSc. Civil Engineering (ITESM) in Mexico."

Ms. Jasmine Neve, Climate Change and Environmental Finance Specialist:

"Natural Disasters and Climate Change Intensify Urban Migration in Mongolia
09/29/16
Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Migrants, Internal Migration
By:
Jasmine Neve, IOM Mongolia"

Mar 6, 2018 at 8:02 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Basque Centre for Climate Change sent 3 delegates to COP 23. Their website is here:

https://www.bc3research.org/

The clue's in the name, I suppose:

"We are a research centre on the causes and consequences of climate change. Led by one of the most recognized scientists in the Climate Change field -Prof. Maria José Sanz, we produce multidisciplinary knowledge to support decision making towards sustainable development at the international level.

With a multidisciplinary team, connected to the main scientific institutions, networks and socio-economic agents, for a decade, our contribution to research of climate change and to the science-policy interface puts us in a unique position to offer knowledge, tools, new methodologies and cross-cutting proposals, that we lead towards action in a collaborative framework with stakeholders, to design and help implement policies aimed at sustainable development."

Delegates:

Ms. María José Sanz Sanchez, Dr:

"Short CV
María José Sanz Sánchez, born in Valencia, Spain, 12 of January 1963.

Areas of expertise

Ecophysiology. Air pollution effects, lower and higher plants. Atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Nitrogen and carbon cycles. Greenhouse Gaseses and other related gases. LULUCF and REDD+.Climate change, scientific bases, multilateral processes, policies and measures. Policy and regulatory frameworks related to air pollution.

Education

1985/ Degree in Biological Sciences. Botany specialty. University of Valencia. Valencia, Spain.
10/1991/ PhD in Biological Sciences, University of Valencia. Valencia, Spain.

Professional experience

2016/ Scientific Director of the Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3), Bilbao, Spain.
05/2012-2015/ Coordinator of the UNREDD Programme, Forestry Department, FAO
11/2011 – 04/2012/ Scientific Director of the Research Institute on Climate Change Zaragoza (I2C2).

04/2011-10/2011/ Senior Programme Officer, Team Leader, Sectoral Issues Unit, Methods, Data and Analysis Programme, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat. Bonn, Germany.

08/2007 – 04/2011/ Senior Programme Officer, Adaptation, Technology and Science Programme, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat. Bonn, Germany
10/2006 - 08/2007/ Director of the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (Laboratory EUPHORE) and the Air Pollution Effects Program, Fundacion CEAM. Valencia, Spain.

01/1999 - 08/2007/ Director of the Air Pollution Effects Program, Foundation CEAM. Valencia, Spain.

2001 and 2000/ Associate Professor, Department of Botany, University of Valencia.

02/1992 - 01/1999/ Senior Researcher, CEAM. Including short periods as visiting Senior Researcher at the JRC-Ispra (EC) and the US Forest Service in Riverside (US).

1996/ Associate Professor, Department of Botany, University of Valencia.

11/1991-07/1992/ Postdoctoral fellow, Arizona State University, Department of Botany and Microbiology, with a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency.

1987-1991/ Doctoral Fellow, Department of Botany, University of Valencia. Visiting Doctoral Fellow at Arizona State University, Departament of Botany and Microbiology twice within this period.

Projects and Contracts

As Programme Coordinator at FAO (11/2011-12/2015):

-The UN REDD Programme. Joint Programme between FAO, UNDP and UNEP supporting REDD+ readiness in 62 developing countries.

- The regional project "...." COMIFAC - African Development Bank. 2012-2014. Ten countries and COMIFAC Secretariat.

- Two technical assistances through FAO with the FCPF-BioCarbon Fund in Uganda and Ethiopia supporting MRV REDD+ related readiness activities.


As Fundacion CEAM staff (1986- 08/2007 ), has coordinated and/or participated in up to 100 projects, mostly in the field of air pollution and climate change, including:

- Principal Researcher in 14 research projects in national public tenders, and participating in eight.

- Principal Investigator in 13 European research projects, and participating in nine.

- Principal Investigator, Coordinator and or participating in 46 projects or contracts with public and private funds of national and international research.

As Doctoral Fellow and PostDoc Researcher,

-Has participated in seven research projects in national public calls, three projects with public and private funding through national and international cooperation.

Publications

A total of 346 publications in the (1986 - 05/2011) period , mostly in the areas of air pollution and climate change:

86 scientists in journals' Scientific Citation Index "(SCI) items.
37 scientific papers in journals not included in the SCI.
189 conference papers and proceedings.
23 book chapters.
Six books.
32 scientific and technical papers.

Other relevant merits

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

2007/ Nobel Peace Prize as a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

2001-2006/ Member of the Spanish Delegation to the IPCC.

2005-2007/ Lead Author. Working Group III, Mitigation. Fourth Assessment Report. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

2004-2006/ Lead Author. Volume I and IV of the "Guidelines for 2006 GHG inventories". Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

2001-2003/ Lead Author. "2003 Good Practice Guidelines. Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry (GPG-LULUCF) ". Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

2012-2014/
- Lead Author. 2013 Revised Supplementary Methods and Good Practice Guidance Arising from the Kyoto Protocol (KP Supplement).
- Review Editor. 2013 Supplement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories: Wetlands (Wetlands Supplement).
2006-2007/ Member of the Editorial Board of Emission Factor Database.Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

World Bank – BioCarbon Fund

2012 (May)/ Senior consultant for the preparation and facilitation of the "Informal Dialogue on Agriculture in the context of the Convention Climate Change" organized by the World Bank and the Meridian Institute in preparation for COP18 in Doha.

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

06/2007/ Consultant for the Adaptation, Technology and Science Programme, Programme Secretariat of the Framework Convention on Climate Change United Nations.

01/2007- 06/2007/ Vice-Chair of the Working Group on Afforestation and Reforestation (A/R WG). CDM Executive Board. Framework Convention on Climate Change United Nations.

01/2007- 06/2007/ Member of the CDM Executive Board, nominated by the Union Europea.Convención Framework on Climate Change United Nations.

2004/ Reviewer CDM afforestation and reforestation projects. CDM Executive Board. Framework Convention on Climate Change United Nations.

2004 – 2006/2013/ Reviewer Inventory of Greenhouse Greenhouses (GHGs). Roster of Experts of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change United Nations.

2004/ Consultant Adaptation, Technology and Science Programme, Programme Secretariat of the Framework Convention on Climate Change United Nations.

2012 (May)/ Consultant for the Methods, Data and Analysis Programme, Secretariat of the Framework Convention on Climate Change United Nations.
2001 - 2006/ Member of the UNFCCC delegation of Spain.

European Commission and the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP)

2002-2007/ Co-Chair of the Air Quality Working Group Panel on Deposition (EC/ICP Forest). EC-UN, ICP-FOREST. "Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution".

1999-2004/ National representative in the Action COST E21 of the European Commission. Forests as sinks in Europe. EU RTD Framework Programme.

1999-2001/ Member of Air Quality Working Group Panel on Deposition (EC/ICP Forest). EC-UN, ICP-FOREST. "Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution".

1997-1998/ National representative in the "Ad-Hoc Working Group on Ozone Directive and Reduction Strategy Development". DG Environment, European Commission.

1991-1997/ National representative in ESSEM COST Action 614 of the European Commission. Impact of elevated CO2 levels, climate change and atmospheric pollutants on the physiology of trees. EU RTD Framework Programme.

As UNFCCC secretariat staff member of the Global Forest Observation Initiative (GFOI) and GEO Forest Carbon Tracking (FCT) Task Force.

2011/ As UNFCCC secretariat staff member of the Steering Committee of the Forest Resources Assessment (FRA), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

2009 - 2011/ As UNFCCC secretariat staff member of the Steering Committee of the Forest Resources Assessment (FRA), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

2007 - 2010/ “Highly Cited Author, Environmental Pollution”.

2003/ Collaborated with the “Science Framework and Implementation, Global Carbon Project, Earth System Science Partnership (IGBP, IHDP, WCRP, DIVERSITAS)”.

2003 - 2007/ Reviewer of the “Air Pollution Criteria Documents”, US Environmental Protection Agency.

2002 - 2007/ Reviewer of “Proyectos de Investigación del Plan Nacional de I+D, Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología”.

1994-2005/ She has taught seminars and classes in different masters and courses of various national universities and public institutions.

1992-2007/ Directed a total of ten dissertations, thesis and final projects.

1999-2007/ Member of several national and international scientific societies
1995 - 2011/ Lectured seminars and classes in different masters and courses of various national universities and public institutions".

Mr. Anil Markandya, Scientific Director:

"Short CV
Professor Markandya is a resource economist who has worked in this field for over thirty years and is acknowledged as one of the leading authorities.


He graduated from the London School of Economics with a Master of Science in Econometrics in 1968 and was awarded his Ph.D. on the Economics of the Environment in 1975.


Since then he has divided his time between academic and advisory work. On the academic side he has published widely in the areas of climate change, environmental valuation, environmental policy, energy and environment, green accounting, macroeconomics and trade. Some of his best-known works include, ´Blueprint for a Green Economy’, ´Green Accounting in Europe’, ´Reconciling Trade and Development’ and ´Cleaning the Ganges’.


He has held academic positions at the universities of Princeton, Berkeley and Harvard in the US and at University College London and Bath University in the UK.


He was a lead author for Chapters of the 3rd and 4th IPCC Assessment Reports on Climate Change.


He was appointed the Executive Director for the Basque Centre for Climate Change in April 2008.


Professor Markandya has worked extensively on climate change and energy and environment issues and has received a number of awards.


He was one of the core team that drafted the IPCC 4th Assessment that was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007.


Recently he was author of a paper on climate regulation that was awarded 2nd Prize at the World Energy Council in Rome in November 2007.


In 2008 he was nominated by Cambridge University as one of the 50 most influential thinkers on sustainability in the world.


In 2012 he was made President Elect of the European Association of Environmental & Resource Economists (EAERE), his two year term as President beginning January 2014.


Professor Markandya has also been an advisor to many national and international organizations, including all the international development banks, UNDP, the EU and the governments of India and the UK. At the World Bank he was a Lead Advisor and worked closely on energy and environmental issues with many governments in Asia, Central Europe and the Former Soviet Union."

Mr. Galarraga Ibon, Consultant:

"Short CV
Ph.D. in Economics (Environmental Economics) from the University of Bath (UK), M.A. Economics at the University of Essex (UK) and B.A. Economics (speciality of International Economics and Development) at the University of Basque Country.
He has worked as an environmental consultant for many years for both public and private clients such as the World Bank, the Department for International Development of the British Government or the Basque Government. He was co-founder of a consultancy company.
Ibon taught microeconomics and macroeconomics at the University of Bath and Economic Policy at the University of Deusto.
During July 2005 and May 2009, he was the Deputy Minister for the Environment of the Basque Government, Vicepresident of IHOBE and member of the board of the Ente Vasco de la Energía (EVE). While in this position he was in charge of the preparation of the Environmental Framework Programme 2007-2010, the Basque Plan to combat Climate Change 2008-2012 or the Contaminated Soil Plan 2007-2012 among others. Regarding the International sphere, he was the Deputy Co-Chair of the Network of Regional Governments on Sustainable Development (nrg4sd) from 2005-2008 and has actively participated in the CoP 11, CoP 12, CoP 13, CoP 14, COP 15 and COP 16.
During 2013-2015 he was the Deputy Director of BC3."

Mar 7, 2018 at 7:45 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Bay Area Council Foundation sent a single delegate to COP 23. Their website is here:

http://www.bayareacouncil.org/about-us/about-the-foundation/

"The Bay Area Council Foundation (BACF) is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization founded in 2004 to fund, manage and implement initiatives that impact the entire Bay Area region of California. The mission of BACF is to support the Bay Area Council and invest philanthropic resources toward building stronger, more vibrant communities, a healthy economy, and a more innovative, globally competitive and sustainable Bay Area region. We do not make grants and function largely as an operating foundation.

We also engage efforts toward global competitiveness, looking at ways to drive innovation, sustainability, and the factors that govern overall well-being for employees and residents in the Bay Area. Our advocacy, research, education, organizing and community-building efforts, as well as specific program initiatives, all exist as part of a strategy focused within established categories of concern. These include:

Global Networks & Connections
Collaborative Governance
Education & Workforce Preparation
Accessible and Affordable Healthcare
Mobility
Housing & Land Use
Resources & Environment
Regional Security & Preparation
Science & Technology
GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS
BACF is unique in that we focus on regional challenges and opportunities. Because the Bay Area faces challenges—such as those related to the environment and economic development—that are not contained within the boundaries of cities or counties, we address regional solutions. Our work takes into consideration the Bay Area mega-region inclusive of the following nine counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, Sonoma, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Solano. Some efforts, like our resilient delta water strategy or our work on the educational data system, have state-wide impact."

"The BACF funds its efforts through grants and contributions from government agencies, foundations, for-profit corporations, and others who share our commitment to building a better Bay Area. Specific funding at the Sustaining Partner level ($10,000 and up) to date has come from the following sources:

• Anonymous
• Bank of America Foundation
• Bay Area Family of Funds
• CitiFoundation
• College Access Foundation
• The Conway Family Foundation
• The Counselors of Real Estate
• The Lisa and Douglas Goldman Fund
• The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
• Home Building Association of Northern California
• Koret Foundation
• The Louis R. Lurie Foundation
• Lurie Management
• The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
• San Francisco Foundation
• S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation
• Sierra Club
• US Bank
• Wachovia Foundation
• Wells Fargo Foundation
• William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

We are grateful for the many other contributors we have supporting our work in the Bay Area. Thank you for your support of the Bay Area Council Foundation."

Delegate:

Mr. Thomas Fahr Steyer, Founder, NextGen Climate. He makes it onto Wikipedia, where he has his own page:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Steyer

"Thomas Fahr Steyer (born June 27, 1957) is an American billionaire hedge fund manager, philanthropist, environmentalist, progressive activist, and fundraiser.

Steyer is the founder and former co-senior managing partner of Farallon Capital and the co-founder of OneCalifornia Bank, which became (through merger) Beneficial State Bank, an Oakland-based community development bank. Farallon Capital manages $20 billion in capital for institutions and high-net-worth individuals. The firm's institutional investors include college endowments and foundations. Since 1986, Steyer has been a partner and member of the Executive Committee at Hellman & Friedman, a San Francisco-based $8 billion private equity firm. In 2010, Steyer and his wife signed The Giving Pledge to donate half of their fortune to charity during their lifetime. In 2012, he sold his stake in and retired from Farallon Capital. Switching his focus to politics and the environment, he launched NextGen America, a non-profit organization that supports progressive positions on climate change, immigration, health care, and education.

Steyer served on the Board of Trustees at Stanford University from 2012 to 2017."

There's much more, including this:

"NextGen America
In 2013, Steyer founded NextGen Climate (now NextGen America), an environmental advocacy nonprofit and political action committee. NextGen Climate provided the environmentalist movement with significant capital and political influence. Steyer spent almost $74 million on the 2014 elections.

In October 2017, NextGen America donated grants totaling $2.3-million to eight national immigration law service organizations, including the University of California Immigrant Legal Services Center, the Immigration Law Clinic at UC Davis School of Law, UC Hastings Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, Asian Americans Advancing Justice — Asian Law Caucus, California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, Center for Community Change, American Immigration Lawyers Association, and the Council on American-Islamic Relations."

Money talks...

Mar 8, 2018 at 7:28 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Beijing Greenovation Hub for Public Welfare Development sent 3 delegates to COP 23. Their website is here:

http://www.ghub.org/cfc_en/?cat=27

"Greenovation Hub is an environmental Think-Do organization with a global outlook.

We promote the development and implementation of sound climate and environmental friendly policies through conducting in-depth analysis and research, and fostering dialogues among stakeholders, in order to drive China's green transition towards a sustainable, equitable and climate resilient future, contributing to the reduction of global ecological footprint.

Vision

A greener future, where everyone has access to clean water, clean air and safe food.

Mission

Promote cross-sectoral dialogue through independent thinking, and enable wider public participation in environmentalism.

Foster synergy among civil society, business and the government to accelerate the green transition in China and around the world.

Core value

Ecological, Inclusive, Collaborative

We are a dynamic and passionate team, with diverse backgrounds, independent thinking and an innovative spirit. As green transition is advancing in China and the world with civil societies developing rapidly, we join together to build ‘a greener future’.

As a Chinese environmental NGO with balanced approaches of a think-tank and advocacy organization, we have been conducting research, and fostering constructive dialogues to promote cutting-edge environmental policy-making; we also encourage more public awareness and participation through innovative and inclusive communications regarding climate resilience and environmental sustainability."

It isn't clear from the website, despite their describing themselves as an NGO, whether the Chinese Government is in any way behind them. The section of the website on climate and energy seems to suggest they're fully subscribed to all the usual mantras. To read the website, anyone would think China was greener than green, rather than the world's single largest emitter of greenhouse gases (which of course assumes that one thinks that emission of greenhouse gases is not green, but then they do claim to think that).

Delegates:

Ms. Hongyu Guo, Program Manager:

"China’s economic growth has been slowing over the past decade. A modern version of the ancient Silk Road, which now connects nearly 70 nations for a value-chain of nearly $1 trillion, enables China to export its productive capacity, opening up new global markets for its companies

The new Silk Road comprises maritime and terrestrial corridors which come with investments in infrastructure, agriculture and energy in the host countries. Developing countries also offer a range of other advantages to Chinese investors: lax regulations, cheap labour and local partners that are keen to break free from the aid system and talk business.

Although its blueprint hints at the development of a “green” Belt and Road, the risk that in a deregulated environment big private companies will forget about the Paris voluntary climate targets is high. NGOs and civil society are taking action to prevent the problem before it arises.

“I think fossil fuels and renewable deployment are interlinked, it’s not either-or” said Hongyu Guo, program manager with the NGO Greenovation Hub, which works to make sure that climate smart practices are enshrined in the Belt and Road’s architecture.

Guo said that China is focusing on the developing world in particular in order to bring the global community up to speed with the climate challenge. “We think that the SDGs and the Paris Agreement are a compass that can guide China’s foreign investments” she said. “That’s because every country works to reduce its emissions under the same framework. China should progressively bring its foreign investments in line with each host country’s growing ambition.”"

Ms. Xiulan Li, Researcher:

"Media Contact Person:
Xiulan Li, Researcher, Global Green Leadership Research Center

Green Development under Belt and Road Initiative: Pushing Forward the Global Implementation of the Paris Agreement
November 11, 2017, Bonn, Germany The Belt and Road Green Development and Climate

Governance Side-Event Series at the 23rd UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP23) has officially been kicked-off, organized by Belt and Road Green Development Partnership.
Chinese and international representatives from government, academia, NGOs, financial organization, enterprises,
and developing Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) countries have been invited to join a six-part series of side events, to discuss how to leverage BRI and other multilateral cooperation mechanisms to achieve the 2.0 and 1.5 degree targets, establish an “Ecological Civilization,” and implement the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals." etc etc.

Mr. Noah Lerner, Research Fellow, Energy and Climate Team, Natural Resources Defense Council:

"Noah Lerner is a Princeton-in-Asia Fellow at the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Beijing Office, helping to support climate and clean-energy policy research and advocacy. He received a B.A. in Biology and East Asian Studies from Amherst College. Noah is also the co-founder and host of Environment China, a bilingual podcast from the Beijing Energy Network that shares the stories of China’s environmental leaders, innovators, and experts.

March 15:ENVIRONMENT IN CHINA: CHANGE IN THE AIR?"

Mar 10, 2018 at 8:33 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Beijing NGO Association for International Exchanges sent 8 delegates to COP 23. This is their website:

http://www.beijingngo.org/

"The Beijing NGO Association for International Exchanges (hereinafter referred to as Beijing NGO) was established in August, 2007. It is a non-profit social organization with independent legal person status and was co-founded by local NGOs in various fields, which can conduct international exchanges and participate in events organized by international NGOs. There are 69 group members at present.

  The purpose of Beijing NGO is to promote exchanges and cooperation between NGOs in Beijing and international NGOs. The main functions of the Association range from attending UN conferences and other international conferences, receiving delegations, holding international events, applying for international organization memberships, opening up new channels of people to people exchanges, developing promotion and research to organizing training and lectures. We've been building up our image as an international, creative, effective, standard and service-oriented non-government organization in Beijng.

  Since its establishment, Beijing NGO has sent delegations to 76 countries. During their visits aboard, the delegates attended international conferences to promote the international images of NGOs in Beijing, including the UN ECOSCO high-level meeting, the annual meeting of UNDPI, the UN Climate Change Conference, the Global Summit of Women, the World Future Energy Summit, the World Social Forum, the World Family Summits, the World Rural Forum, the Asia-Europe People’s Forum and the China-Africa People's Forum.

  Meanwhile, the Association has received more than 100 delegations from different international organizations over 120 countries, ranging from UN officials, leading ministerial officials of foreign countries to heads of international organizations. we have enhanced mutual understanding and promoted cooperation.

  Beijing NGO has also organized a wide array of international conferences and activities, such as the Sustainable Development and Green Olympics, the 3rd United Nations NGO Pacific-Asia Region Symposium, the Public Health Forum, the 4th United Nations NGO Pacific-Asia Region Symposium, the 7th Asia-Europe People’s Forum, the Global Summit of Women, the Peking and Kunqu Opera Seminar, the Beijing International Walking Festival, the Seminar of Red Cross in Beijing, the Beijing International Forum on People to People Friendship, the Foreign Friends Walking along Kunming Lake, the Beijing International Cuisine Festival, the International Women's Day Tour, the Studies of Ancient Chinese Civilization - Lecture on Beijing Culture and the Gala for International Organizations in Beijing, just to name a few. Through these events, Beijing NGO has gradually set up a platform to facilitate international exchanges of local NGOs, ensuring a stable development of people to people exchanges in Beijing.

  In March 2010, Beijing NGO became a group member of the China NGO Network for International Exchanges (hereinafter referred to as CNIE) and the affiliation has allowed it to provide a broader international exchange platform for NGOs in Beijing. The President of the 1st Council was Mr. Huang Chengxiang, Honorary Vice President of CNIE. The current President is Mr. Xiong Daxin, Vice President of CNIE. In July 2009, Mr. Sha Zukang, former Undersecretary General of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs wrote the following inscription for Beijing: I hope Beijing NGO will make new contribution to the cause of people-to-people international exchanges in Beijing."

Also:

"On November 12th to 19th, 2017, Beijing NGO, together with Beijing People's Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries (BPAFFC), Beijing Association for Science and Technology (BAST) and Beijing Automotive Group Co., Ltd. (BAIC Group), sent a delegation to Bonn for the United Nations Climate Change Conference side event. The delegation visited Berlin, Geneva and Zurich and held exchange activities with World Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF), Oak Foundation and related organizations over environment protection, green energy, science and technology innovation and other issues.

  As the observer member to the UN Climate Change Conference, Beijing NGO sent its 7th delegation to Bonn for this conference and held side event under the theme of “A pathway to the future of renewable energy: China's vision and action” with WWF and other organizations at China Pavilion. Mr. Gao Shuangjin, head of the delegation and Vice President of Beijing NGO, delivered a speech and introduced the efforts by NGOs in China on energy saving and environment protection, low carbon and emission reduction and other area which received high appreciation from delegates present. Ms. Bao Xiaoqin, member of BAST and Chairperson of Shunyi District Association of Science and Technology, and Mr. Li Kai, Director of Brand Promotion Department, BAIC Group, made remarks and exchanges ideas with representatives present over science and technology driven environment protection, new social and economic achievements of Shunyi District and future of green development for Beijing's automotive industry. Mr. Xu Qiang, Secretary General of Beijing NGO, presided over the side event and signing ceremony. During the side event, Beijing NGO held a photo exhibition and handed out about 1,000 brochures to promote the efforts by Beijing NGOs on improving people’s awareness for environment protection, actions on combating climate change and advancing the UN Sustainable Development Goal to explore new opportunities for international exchanges and cooperation. During their stay in Germany, the delegation visited Chinese Embassy in Germany and Secretariat of the Organizing Committee of UN Climate Change Conference and exchanged views with Mr. Quinn, Adviser to E.U.-China Committee and expert on NGO studies from Freie Universit?t Berlin, heads of environmental and human rights organizations from U.S., Canada, Algeria, Kenya, Zambia, Chinese Taiwan and other countries and regions.

  While in Switzerland, they visited WWF headquarters and its Zurich office and Oak Foundation, promoted the efforts by Beijing NGOs and introduced China’s related policies and international exchange programs. This visit enhanced our connection with international organizations, enriched and extended the exchange and cooperation programs with WWF and Oak Foundation and strengthened cultural exchange and public communication."

Delegates:

Mr. Shuangjin Gao, Vice President:

"Vice President Mr. Gao Shuangjin delivered a speech at China Pavilion side event at UN Climate Change Conference and held Beijing NGO Environmental Action Photo Exhibition on November 13th, 2017"

Mr. Qiang Xu, Secretary General.

Mr. Ruqing Xie, Staff.

Mr. Hang Li, Director, Brand Management, Beijing Automotive Group Co., Ltd. From Wikipedia

"It is often ranked as the fifth or fourth-largest Chinese automaker by volume and boasts several successful passenger-car joint ventures with foreign firms. However, a significant proportion of its output is agricultural, commercial, and military vehicles.

In 2014, manufacture of 2.25 million whole vehicles made BAIC the fourth largest among domestic rivals although it placed second in terms of commercial vehicle output."

Not very "green", then, even if they do dabble in electric vehicles (though to give credit for that dabbling, one would have to accept that electric vehicles are green, especially in a country that relies heavily on coal for its electricity production).

Ms. Xiaoqin Bao, President, Beijing Shunyi Association for Science and Technology.

Mr. Jia Qi

Ms. Xiaodan Li

Mr. Yongsheng Luo

Mar 11, 2018 at 7:43 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Bellona Foundation sent 9 delegates to COP 23. This is their website:

http://bellona.org/

"The Bellona Foundation is an independent non-profit organization that aims to meet and fight the climate challenges, through identifying and implementing sustainable environmental solutions. We work towards reaching a greater ecological understanding, protection of nature, the environment and health. Bellona is engaged in a broad specter of current national and international environmental questions and issues around the world."

"Bellona recognized early on that neither the environmental organizations nor the government alone could drive forward solutions to the environmental challenges we’re facing. We are dependent on the industry increasingly understanding the consequences of their presence, and Bellona is working hard for companies to be prepared to tackle the environmental challenges."

And:

"Climate change
This section discusses ongoing causes of anthropogenic climate change and Bellona’s investigations of what the world can do to mitigate its already evident effects."

[It's a big section on their website...].

Delegates:

Mr. Olav Øye, Adviser:

"Olav works with CO2 capture, transport and storage. Olav holds a master’s degree in EU studies from the Université libre de Bruxelles. He has previously worked with EU climate and energy policy as an adviser for The Brussels Office, a consultancy. He has also worked as a journalist for various Norwegian newspapers."

Ms. Lan Marie Nguyen Berg:

She has her own Wikipedia entry, which tells us:

"Lan Marie Nguyen Berg (born March 4, 1987 in Oslo ) is a Norwegian politician for the environmental party De Grønne .

In October 2015 she was appointed City Council for Environment and Transport in Oslo. She previously worked at the Cicero Center for Climate Research at the University of Oslo .

Political work
Lan Marie Nguyen Berg joined Spire in 2009. She also worked for the Melafestivalen . Otherwise, she is known as a member of the blogger Green Girls. She has lived in Tuvalu , in Kenya , in South Africa and in Vietnam , but is now living in Kværnerbyen in borough Old Oslo . She was appointed as the first candidate for the Oslo MDG on September 26, 2014, and after the election she became city ​​council for environment and transport."

Mr. Magnus Borgen. This sounds like him:

"Mr. Magnus Borgen is the Head of Communication of the Sahara Forest Project and is educated as a political scientist from the University of Oslo. He started in SFP in 2016, previously holding the position as Head of Communications at the Bellona Foundation. He worked as a part of the Bellona management team for seven years. Borgen previously worked as a journalist and contributed to several Norwegian and international media outlets with written articles and research for TV documentaries. He is also author of one book."

Mr. Christian Eriksen:

"Trends are not just about buildings, though. Norway-based environmental organisation Bellona says that they are developing an overarching concept for emission-free construction sites, talking to developers, contractors, and equipment manufacturers.

Christian Eriksen, Senior Advisor, Energy, outlines some new measures which are designed to go one better. These include making renewable energy carriers available on-site by using more electricity and district heating instead of fossil fuels for processes, using more environmentally-friendly materials for lower emissions in production (e.g. recycled steel, and solid wood), better thinking around transport of surplus masses (soil/rock/gravel), and improved waste management and recycling.

“Contractors in Norway are generally quite good at recycling – often a criterion in tenders,” comments Mr Eriksen. He adds that feedback from contractors says that Bellona’s list of measures “is all achievable in the near future.”

Mr. Raymond Johansen, Oslo kommune:

"Governing Mayor Raymond Johansen (Labour Party)
Governing Mayor is the head of the City Government and appoints up to seven Vice Mayors. The role of the Governing Mayor can be compared to that of a prime minister while the role of the Vice Mayors may be compared to that of national government ministers. The Governing Mayor coordinates the City Government’s work, and is responsible for cross cutting policies and coordinating staff functions.

Governing Mayor Johansen determines the portfolios of the Vice Mayors and coordinates the City Government’s work. He also has the responsibility for civil protection and security in Oslo as well as international cooperation and policy.

Governing Mayor Johansen (born 1961) has lived in Oslo for most of his life. He has to adult twin-sons and is married to Christin Kristoffersen.

Johansen is educated as a plumber, but most of his working life has been dedicated to politics. At the age of 30 he was appointed to the City Government in Oslo as Vice Mayor for Transport and Nature Preservation, then representing the Socialist Left Party. Since joining the Norwegian Labour Party in 1997 Governing Mayor Johansen has served as State Secretary in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs under both Cabinets of Jens Stoltenberg. Johansen served as the Secretary General of the Labour Party from 2009 until 2015 when he resigned to run for Governing Mayor of Oslo.

Governing Mayor Johansen has gained broad experience from working with international development from his work as Head of Department in the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation and as Secretary General for the Norwegian Refugee Council. The Governing Mayor’s interests also cover areas such as sports, and Johansen was previously member of the board of Vålerenga Football Club in Oslo.

On 21 October 2015 Raymond Johansen started his term as Governing Mayor of Oslo and leads a City Government Coalition composed of representatives from the Labour Party, the Green Party and the Socialist Left Party.

Oslo is one of the fastest growing cities in Europe, and has inhabitants from more than 200 nations. The capital is a green city with a unique access to nature, pulsating cultural life, great academic institutions and a business community full of initiative. Governing Mayor Johansen has very ambitious goals for the development of Oslo, ensuring a vibrant, green and climate-smart city with equal opportunities for everyone."

Ms. Pauline Johanne Kajl:

From Linkedin:

"Pauline Johanne Kajl
ecologist

Oslo, Oslo, Norway environmental Services
Current
Bellona
Previous
Bellona Europe ,Norad - Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation ,TolkeNett AS
Education
Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB)"

Mr. Geir Lippestad. This might be his wikipedia page - interesting (well, I think so - he's not your average COP23 attendee):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geir_Lippestad

Ms. Teodora Serafimova, Advisor, Bellona Europa:

"Teodora Serafimova joined Bellona Europa in March 2014. She holds a BSc in Environmental Policy from the London School of Economics, and a Master of Advanced International Studies from the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna. She has previously gained work experience at the UNFCCC Secretariat where she provided support to the climate negotiations. Prior to joining Bellona, Teodora completed a traineeship at DG Environment of the European Commission. At Bellona Europa Teodora focuses on EU policies to drive the decarbonisation and electrification of road transport. She also supports the development and planning for Bellona’s engagement in international climate negotiations."

Mr. Keith Whiriskey, Policy Manager Climate Technologies, Bellona Europa:

"Keith Whiriskey has contributed to the Bellona foundation as a CCS specialist since 2011, where his fields of responsibility include the development of CCS in energy and industry policy along with lead authoring of Bellona publications. Keith holds an MSc in Carbon Capture and Storage from the University of Edinburgh and a BSc in Geology from the National University of Ireland. Keith has contributed to a diverse number of projects including, techno economic modelling of CCS deployment in Romania, Hungary and the Ukraine, CO2 capture technology assessments, CO2 storage characterisation, progressing enhanced oil recovery in the north sea, along with energy policy and economic incentives for CCS deployment."

Mar 12, 2018 at 8:28 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson

Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation sent 2 delegates to COP 23. Their website is here:

http://www.biancajagger.org/

"The Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation (BJHRF) is dedicated to defending human rights, ending violence against women and girls, addressing the threat of climate change, supporting the rights of indigenous peoples and defending the rights of future generations. These issues may seen unrelated but their causes and some of their solutions are interconnected. I have always tried to look at the bigger picture. I am a firm believer in Aristotle’s observation, ‘The whole is more than the sum of its parts.’"

"ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND CLIMATE CHANGE
The BJHRF recognises that climate change is the most urgent threat of our time; a critical human rights issue impacting every aspect of our lives: peace, security, poverty, hunger, health, mass migration and economics.

We raise awareness of the catastrophic effects of climate change, calling for corporations to be held accountable and urging governments to fulfil their pledges to reduce carbon emissions.

The BJHRF is calling for a comprehensive, just, legally binding climate treaty, the transfer of technology to developing countries, adequate adaptation, mitigation and implementation mechanisms, and a REDD+ agreement with safeguards for communities and indigenous peoples’ rights.

The BJHRF advocates a shift away from fossil fuels and towards a world powered by renewable energy. We campaign against governments endorsement of hydraulic fracturing or ’fracking’ as a solution to the energy crisis.

The BJHRF has commissioned a Human Rights Impact Assessment of fracking from the Global Network for the Study of Human Rights and the Environment, www.gnhre.org, a network of scholars, NGO members and policy makers.

The BJHRF was an active participant at the UNFCCC climate conference in Peru. Just before the final result of COP20 I published an article on my take on the negotiations in the Huffington Post, entitled At the Heart of COP20: Loss and Damage. I and the BJHRF are looking forward to our participation at COP21 in Paris next year."

The site seems to need to be brought up to date,given that COP 21 was over 2 years ago, and is not next year.

Delegates:

Ms. Bianca Jagger, Founder and President of the Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation.

For completeness, her personal Wikipedia page is here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bianca_Jagger

Ms. Catriona Isabella Stuart Ward, Writer and Researcher:

Not a lot of definite information on the internet. Seems to have attended several COPs.

Mar 13, 2018 at 7:46 PM | Unregistered CommenterMark Hodgson